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Article: Serum and plasma epidermal growth factor in thyroid disorders

TitleSerum and plasma epidermal growth factor in thyroid disorders
Authors
Issue Date1992
Citation
Acta Endocrinologica, 1992, v. 127 n. 1, p. 52-57 How to Cite?
AbstractEpidermal growth factor (EGF) is an important mitogen and its secretion in neonatal animals has been shown to be affected by thyroid hormone levels. EGF in blood of humans is found in both platelets (as reflected in its serum level) and in plasma; its origin in plasma remains unclear. Serum and plasma EGF were studied in a group of patients with thyroid disorders. Twenty hyperthyroid subjects (3M, 17F) aged 37.3 ± 14.9 years and 10 hypothyroid patients (3M, 7F) aged 58.3 ± 18.6 years were studied before and after euthyroidism was restored. Before treatment, serum EGE in the hyperthyroid patients was elevated compared to normal controls (501 ± 376 vs 270 ± 154 pmol/l, p < 0.001). After treatment of hyperthyroidism, serum EGF returned to the normal levels (232 ± 176 pmol/l). In contrast, serum EGF was not significantly different in the hypothyroid subjects either before or after treatment (151 ± 194 and 237 ± 153 pmol/l respectively). A significant correlation (r = 0.461, p < 0.001) between serum EGF and serum-free thyroxine index (FTI) was found when all samples from both untreated and treated hyper- and hypothyroid patients were examined. Multiple regression analysis revealed that both serum FTI and platelet count independently affected the serum EGF levels. Similarly, plasma EGF was also elevated in untreated hyperthyroid patients with a median of 26.4 pmol/l (range < 16.6-88.0), whereas all normal controls and hypothyroid subjects had unmeasurable levels. It is concluded that thyroid hormones affect EGF levels in plasma and serum. The physiological significance of this finding is unclear and needs further elucidation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161938
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKung, AWCen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, WMen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, ESKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:16:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:16:10Z-
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationActa Endocrinologica, 1992, v. 127 n. 1, p. 52-57en_US
dc.identifier.issn0001-5598en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161938-
dc.description.abstractEpidermal growth factor (EGF) is an important mitogen and its secretion in neonatal animals has been shown to be affected by thyroid hormone levels. EGF in blood of humans is found in both platelets (as reflected in its serum level) and in plasma; its origin in plasma remains unclear. Serum and plasma EGF were studied in a group of patients with thyroid disorders. Twenty hyperthyroid subjects (3M, 17F) aged 37.3 ± 14.9 years and 10 hypothyroid patients (3M, 7F) aged 58.3 ± 18.6 years were studied before and after euthyroidism was restored. Before treatment, serum EGE in the hyperthyroid patients was elevated compared to normal controls (501 ± 376 vs 270 ± 154 pmol/l, p < 0.001). After treatment of hyperthyroidism, serum EGF returned to the normal levels (232 ± 176 pmol/l). In contrast, serum EGF was not significantly different in the hypothyroid subjects either before or after treatment (151 ± 194 and 237 ± 153 pmol/l respectively). A significant correlation (r = 0.461, p < 0.001) between serum EGF and serum-free thyroxine index (FTI) was found when all samples from both untreated and treated hyper- and hypothyroid patients were examined. Multiple regression analysis revealed that both serum FTI and platelet count independently affected the serum EGF levels. Similarly, plasma EGF was also elevated in untreated hyperthyroid patients with a median of 26.4 pmol/l (range < 16.6-88.0), whereas all normal controls and hypothyroid subjects had unmeasurable levels. It is concluded that thyroid hormones affect EGF levels in plasma and serum. The physiological significance of this finding is unclear and needs further elucidation.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofActa Endocrinologicaen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshEpidermal Growth Factor - Analysis - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHyperthyroidism - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshHypothyroidism - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPlatelet Counten_US
dc.subject.meshRadioimmunoassayen_US
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshThyroid Diseases - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshThyroxine - Blooden_US
dc.titleSerum and plasma epidermal growth factor in thyroid disordersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKung, AWC:awckung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKung, AWC=rp00368en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid1519423-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0026658237en_US
dc.identifier.volume127en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage52en_US
dc.identifier.epage57en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1992JJ63700009-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKung, AWC=7102322339en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, WM=7103196477en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, ESK=36896576900en_US

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