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Article: Dopaminergic control of thyrotropin, α-subunit, thyrotropin β-subunit, and prolactin in euthyroidism and hypothyroidism: Dissociation responses to dopamine receptor blockade with metoclopramide in hypothyroid subjects

TitleDopaminergic control of thyrotropin, α-subunit, thyrotropin β-subunit, and prolactin in euthyroidism and hypothyroidism: Dissociation responses to dopamine receptor blockade with metoclopramide in hypothyroid subjects
Authors
Issue Date1981
PublisherThe Endocrine Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcem.endojournals.org
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology And Metabolism, 1981, v. 53 n. 2, p. 360-363 How to Cite?
AbstractThirteen female patients (ages 29-68 yr) with primary hypothyroidism and 10 euthyroid volunteers (5 females and 5 males, ages 22-43 yr) each received a single 10-mg dose of the dopamine-receptor blocking drug,metoclopramide. Intact TSH, PRL, α-subunit, and β-TSH responses over a 3-h period after drug administration have been compared with circulating hormone levels after placebo. In euthyroid subjects, intact TSH and α-subunit showed clear rises after metoclopramide compared with placebo (mean total incremental changes ± SE: intact TSH, 7.1 ± 1.3 vs. -3.4 ± 1.3 mU/liter. P<0.001; α-subunit, 0.9 ± 0.2 vs. -1.3 ± 0.6 ng/ml. P<0.001). β-TSH changes, however, did not differ significantly from placebo (0.4 ± 0.5 vs. 1.1 ± 0.5 ng/ml, not significant). Total incremental responses (mean ± SE) were very much greater in hypothyroid than in euthyroid subjects for intact TSH (35.6 ± 9.8 vs. 7.1 ± 1.3 mU/liter, P<0.001) α-subunit (7.2 ± 1.4 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 ng/ml, P<0.001), and β-TSH (6.5 ± 2.2 vs. 0.4 ± 0.5 ng/ml, P<0.001). Within the hypothyroid group the total incremental intact TSH responses (mean ± SE) were significantly less in patients with T4 less than 50 nmol/liter than in patients with T4 levels greater than 50 nmol/liter (4.0 ± 7.7 vs. 52.5 ± 12.6 mU/liter, P<0.02). In contrast, total incremental PRL, α-subunit, and β-TSH responses did not differ significantly between hypothyroid patients with T4 less than 50 nmol/liter (PRL, 27.7 ± 8.0 mU/liter; α-subunit, 8.5 ± 3.2 ng/ml; β-TSH, 3.2 ± 1.9 ng/ml) and those with T4 levels greater than 50 nmol/liter (PRL, 45.2 ± 5.8 nU/liter; α-subunit, 6.4 ± 1.1 ng/nl; β-TSH, 8.5 ± 3.3 ng/ml). However, β-TSH responses correlated directly with intact TSH responses in hypothyroid subjects (r=0.63; P<0.05), whereas PRL and α-subunit responses were not significantly related to the intact TSH response. Again in hypothyroid subjects, the PRL response was inversely related to subject age (r=-0.76; P<0.05), whereas the intact TSH, α-subunit, and β-TSH responses were unrelated to subject age. We conclude from these data that, as with intact TSH, α-subunit and β-TSH relase is under inhibitory dopaminergic control. Subunit release after dopamine antagonism is seen most clearly in hypothyroid subjects in whom the dominant negative TSH response to dopamine antagonism and hence the dopaminergic inhibition of intact TSH release declines with increasingly severe hypothyroidism. Intact TSH responses in hypothyroid subjects are paralleled by β-TSH responses, whereas PRL and α-subunit responses are not so clearly related to intact TSH responses and thyroid status.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161661
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.531
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.940
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorScanlon, MFen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorHeath, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:13:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:13:40Z-
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Endocrinology And Metabolism, 1981, v. 53 n. 2, p. 360-363en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-972Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161661-
dc.description.abstractThirteen female patients (ages 29-68 yr) with primary hypothyroidism and 10 euthyroid volunteers (5 females and 5 males, ages 22-43 yr) each received a single 10-mg dose of the dopamine-receptor blocking drug,metoclopramide. Intact TSH, PRL, α-subunit, and β-TSH responses over a 3-h period after drug administration have been compared with circulating hormone levels after placebo. In euthyroid subjects, intact TSH and α-subunit showed clear rises after metoclopramide compared with placebo (mean total incremental changes ± SE: intact TSH, 7.1 ± 1.3 vs. -3.4 ± 1.3 mU/liter. P<0.001; α-subunit, 0.9 ± 0.2 vs. -1.3 ± 0.6 ng/ml. P<0.001). β-TSH changes, however, did not differ significantly from placebo (0.4 ± 0.5 vs. 1.1 ± 0.5 ng/ml, not significant). Total incremental responses (mean ± SE) were very much greater in hypothyroid than in euthyroid subjects for intact TSH (35.6 ± 9.8 vs. 7.1 ± 1.3 mU/liter, P<0.001) α-subunit (7.2 ± 1.4 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 ng/ml, P<0.001), and β-TSH (6.5 ± 2.2 vs. 0.4 ± 0.5 ng/ml, P<0.001). Within the hypothyroid group the total incremental intact TSH responses (mean ± SE) were significantly less in patients with T4 less than 50 nmol/liter than in patients with T4 levels greater than 50 nmol/liter (4.0 ± 7.7 vs. 52.5 ± 12.6 mU/liter, P<0.02). In contrast, total incremental PRL, α-subunit, and β-TSH responses did not differ significantly between hypothyroid patients with T4 less than 50 nmol/liter (PRL, 27.7 ± 8.0 mU/liter; α-subunit, 8.5 ± 3.2 ng/ml; β-TSH, 3.2 ± 1.9 ng/ml) and those with T4 levels greater than 50 nmol/liter (PRL, 45.2 ± 5.8 nU/liter; α-subunit, 6.4 ± 1.1 ng/nl; β-TSH, 8.5 ± 3.3 ng/ml). However, β-TSH responses correlated directly with intact TSH responses in hypothyroid subjects (r=0.63; P<0.05), whereas PRL and α-subunit responses were not significantly related to the intact TSH response. Again in hypothyroid subjects, the PRL response was inversely related to subject age (r=-0.76; P<0.05), whereas the intact TSH, α-subunit, and β-TSH responses were unrelated to subject age. We conclude from these data that, as with intact TSH, α-subunit and β-TSH relase is under inhibitory dopaminergic control. Subunit release after dopamine antagonism is seen most clearly in hypothyroid subjects in whom the dominant negative TSH response to dopamine antagonism and hence the dopaminergic inhibition of intact TSH release declines with increasingly severe hypothyroidism. Intact TSH responses in hypothyroid subjects are paralleled by β-TSH responses, whereas PRL and α-subunit responses are not so clearly related to intact TSH responses and thyroid status.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Endocrine Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcem.endojournals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAgingen_US
dc.subject.meshDopamine - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHypothyroidism - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshKineticsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMetoclopramide - Diagnostic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshProlactin - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshThyrotropin - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshThyroxine - Blooden_US
dc.titleDopaminergic control of thyrotropin, α-subunit, thyrotropin β-subunit, and prolactin in euthyroidism and hypothyroidism: Dissociation responses to dopamine receptor blockade with metoclopramide in hypothyroid subjectsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, V:vnychana@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, V=rp00320en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1210/jcem-53-2-360-
dc.identifier.pmid7251818-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0019737782en_US
dc.identifier.volume53en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage360en_US
dc.identifier.epage363en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1981MA12500019-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridScanlon, MF=7102353622en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, V=7202654865en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHeath, M=16739507800en_US

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