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Article: Dissociated thyroxine, triiodothyronine and reverse triiodothyronine levels in patients with familial goiter due to iodide organification defects

TitleDissociated thyroxine, triiodothyronine and reverse triiodothyronine levels in patients with familial goiter due to iodide organification defects
Authors
Issue Date1979
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664
Citation
Clinical Endocrinology, 1979, v. 11 n. 3, p. 257-265 How to Cite?
AbstractThe thyroid function of patients with three different types of organification defect was studied. All patients were characterized by a high thyroidal 131I uptake and a positive perchlorate discharge. Patients with Pendred's syndrome who had goitre and congenital nerve deafness were mostly euthyroid with normal circulating thyroid hormone levels. Only two of them had compensated euthyroidism with elevated total T3, high basal TSH and delayed return to basal value after TRH. The patients who were euthyroid with large goitres and normal hearing had elevated total T3 and an exaggerated TSH response to TRH. The thyroid function of these two groups of patients contrasted with that of goitrous cretins, who were clinically hypothyroid with low circulating total T4, increased T3 and decreased rT3 levels. The data suggest that in patients with intrathyroidal iodine deficiency secondary to organification defect, there is preferential T3 production in an effort to maintain euthyroid state, and this is further substantiated in the case of gross thyroid insufficiency either by enhanced peripheral conversion of T4 to T3, or reduced metabolic clearance of T3 and increased clearance of rT3, resulting in elevated T3 and decreased rT3 levels.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161643
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.487
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.314
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorYeung, RTTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:13:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:13:27Z-
dc.date.issued1979en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Endocrinology, 1979, v. 11 n. 3, p. 257-265en_US
dc.identifier.issn0300-0664en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161643-
dc.description.abstractThe thyroid function of patients with three different types of organification defect was studied. All patients were characterized by a high thyroidal 131I uptake and a positive perchlorate discharge. Patients with Pendred's syndrome who had goitre and congenital nerve deafness were mostly euthyroid with normal circulating thyroid hormone levels. Only two of them had compensated euthyroidism with elevated total T3, high basal TSH and delayed return to basal value after TRH. The patients who were euthyroid with large goitres and normal hearing had elevated total T3 and an exaggerated TSH response to TRH. The thyroid function of these two groups of patients contrasted with that of goitrous cretins, who were clinically hypothyroid with low circulating total T4, increased T3 and decreased rT3 levels. The data suggest that in patients with intrathyroidal iodine deficiency secondary to organification defect, there is preferential T3 production in an effort to maintain euthyroid state, and this is further substantiated in the case of gross thyroid insufficiency either by enhanced peripheral conversion of T4 to T3, or reduced metabolic clearance of T3 and increased clearance of rT3, resulting in elevated T3 and decreased rT3 levels.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0300-0664en_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Endocrinologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshCongenital Hypothyroidism - Blood - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshDeafness - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGoiter - Blood - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIodine - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPedigreeen_US
dc.subject.meshSyndromeen_US
dc.subject.meshThyrotropin - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshThyroxine - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshTriiodothyronine - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshTriiodothyronine, Reverse - Blooden_US
dc.titleDissociated thyroxine, triiodothyronine and reverse triiodothyronine levels in patients with familial goiter due to iodide organification defectsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, V:vnychana@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, V=rp00320en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2265.1979.tb03073.x-
dc.identifier.pmid509742-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0018606010en_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage257en_US
dc.identifier.epage265en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1979HK18800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, V=7202654865en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, C=7501631357en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, RTT=7102833337en_US

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