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Article: Hyperprolactinemia in males with systemic lupus erythematosus

TitleHyperprolactinemia in males with systemic lupus erythematosus
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherJournal of Rheumatology Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jrheum.com
Citation
Journal Of Rheumatology, 1998, v. 25 n. 12, p. 2357-2363 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. To study prospectively the serum prolactin (PRL) concentrations among male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and their possible relationship to disease activity and manifestations. Methods. Serum PRL levels were measured by radioimmunoassay in 31 male patients with SLE and 31 age matched controls. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory features of the patients were obtained. Mean PRL levels from both groups were compared, and PRL from patients with SLE was correlated with variables of disease activity, including the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), complement level, and anti-dsDNA titer. Thirteen patients were followed serially and changes in PRL levels in relation to fluctuation in disease activity were evaluated. Results. Mean PRL levels were higher in male patients with SLE than healthy controls; however, the difference did not reach statistical significance (230 vs 194 mlU/l; p = 0.06). Hyperprolactinemia was found in 4 patients (13%) and was not associated with particular clinical manifestations or autoantibodies. Considering all patients as a whole, PRL levels did not correlate with variables of disease activity and there was no difference in PRL between patients with active versus inactive disease. A subanalysis of the 4 hyperprolactinemic patients revealed a higher SLEDAI score than those with normal PRL (8.8 vs 3.7; p = 0.20); however, the difference was not statistically significant. Among the hyperprolactinemic patients, PRL levels did not correlate with SLEDAI score or anti-dsDNA titer. Prospective studies of PRL levels in 13 patients did not indicate a role of PRL in the monitoring of disease activity or predicting relapses. Conclusion. Hyperprolactinemia occurred in a small proportion of male patients with SLE and its significance remained unclear. Serum PRL level did not correlate with disease activity and was not a reliable marker for disease monitoring.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161624
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.236
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.225
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, CCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, CSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, KWen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, RWSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-05T05:13:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-05T05:13:12Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Rheumatology, 1998, v. 25 n. 12, p. 2357-2363en_US
dc.identifier.issn0315-162Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161624-
dc.description.abstractObjective. To study prospectively the serum prolactin (PRL) concentrations among male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and their possible relationship to disease activity and manifestations. Methods. Serum PRL levels were measured by radioimmunoassay in 31 male patients with SLE and 31 age matched controls. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory features of the patients were obtained. Mean PRL levels from both groups were compared, and PRL from patients with SLE was correlated with variables of disease activity, including the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), complement level, and anti-dsDNA titer. Thirteen patients were followed serially and changes in PRL levels in relation to fluctuation in disease activity were evaluated. Results. Mean PRL levels were higher in male patients with SLE than healthy controls; however, the difference did not reach statistical significance (230 vs 194 mlU/l; p = 0.06). Hyperprolactinemia was found in 4 patients (13%) and was not associated with particular clinical manifestations or autoantibodies. Considering all patients as a whole, PRL levels did not correlate with variables of disease activity and there was no difference in PRL between patients with active versus inactive disease. A subanalysis of the 4 hyperprolactinemic patients revealed a higher SLEDAI score than those with normal PRL (8.8 vs 3.7; p = 0.20); however, the difference was not statistically significant. Among the hyperprolactinemic patients, PRL levels did not correlate with SLEDAI score or anti-dsDNA titer. Prospective studies of PRL levels in 13 patients did not indicate a role of PRL in the monitoring of disease activity or predicting relapses. Conclusion. Hyperprolactinemia occurred in a small proportion of male patients with SLE and its significance remained unclear. Serum PRL level did not correlate with disease activity and was not a reliable marker for disease monitoring.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Rheumatology Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jrheum.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Rheumatologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Antinuclear - Blood - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshComplement C3 - Drug Effects - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshComplement C4 - Drug Effects - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHyperprolactinemia - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshImmunosuppressive Agents - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshLupus Erythematosus, Systemic - Blood - Drug Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshProlactin - Blood - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshSeverity Of Illness Indexen_US
dc.titleHyperprolactinemia in males with systemic lupus erythematosusen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, CS:cslau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, CS=rp01348en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid9858430-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0002771243en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0002771243&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage2357en_US
dc.identifier.epage2363en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000077280600012-
dc.publisher.placeCanadaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, CC=34668219600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CS=14035682100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, KW=35788977700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, RWS=34875928200en_US

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