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Postgraduate Thesis: Lĭ li: an interpretation
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TitleLĭ li: an interpretation
 
AuthorsLewis, Colin Joseph.
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
AbstractL? ritual (禮) is one of the most distinctive features of Confucianism (r? ji?, 儒家), but interpreters have yet to agree on the extent of its functions and whether the Confucians provide any justification of its use. Contemporary attempts to derive such justification have typically relied upon explaining l?'s relationship with r?n humaneness (仁), another core concept for Confucianism that is frequently given great prominence in Confucian ethics. Drawing upon such approaches, I propose that at least one aspect of l?'s function is best understood as being bound-up with that of r?n and that this function arguably justifies Confucian appeals to l? as a guide to conduct. My approach is distinct from previous interpretations, however, in that I argue that l? serves metaphorically as the language by which attitudes conducive to r?n are managed and expressed, and that the successful application of l?, including its use in symbolizing ethically significant normative statuses, contributes to the Confucian ideal of harmony (h?, 和) on both interpersonal and intrapersonal levels. The upshot of this interpretation is that, despite criticisms both modern and ancient, we can clearly see how the Confucians justifiably imbue a particular aspect of traditional mores with normative ethical force.
 
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
 
SubjectLi.
Philosophy, Confucian - China.
 
Dept/ProgramPhilosophy
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Colin Joseph.
 
dc.date.hkucongregation2012
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractL? ritual (禮) is one of the most distinctive features of Confucianism (r? ji?, 儒家), but interpreters have yet to agree on the extent of its functions and whether the Confucians provide any justification of its use. Contemporary attempts to derive such justification have typically relied upon explaining l?'s relationship with r?n humaneness (仁), another core concept for Confucianism that is frequently given great prominence in Confucian ethics. Drawing upon such approaches, I propose that at least one aspect of l?'s function is best understood as being bound-up with that of r?n and that this function arguably justifies Confucian appeals to l? as a guide to conduct. My approach is distinct from previous interpretations, however, in that I argue that l? serves metaphorically as the language by which attitudes conducive to r?n are managed and expressed, and that the successful application of l?, including its use in symbolizing ethically significant normative statuses, contributes to the Confucian ideal of harmony (h?, 和) on both interpersonal and intrapersonal levels. The upshot of this interpretation is that, despite criticisms both modern and ancient, we can clearly see how the Confucians justifiably imbue a particular aspect of traditional mores with normative ethical force.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePhilosophy
 
dc.description.thesislevelmaster's
 
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4807987
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B4807987X
 
dc.subject.lcshLi.
 
dc.subject.lcshPhilosophy, Confucian - China.
 
dc.titleLĭ li: an interpretation
 
dc.typePG_Thesis
 
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<date.issued>2012</date.issued>
<description.abstract>&#65279;L? ritual (&#31150;) is one of the most distinctive features of Confucianism (r? ji?, &#20754;&#23478;),

but interpreters have yet to agree on the extent of its functions and whether the

Confucians provide any justification of its use. Contemporary attempts to derive

such justification have typically relied upon explaining l?&apos;s relationship with r?n

humaneness (&#20161;), another core concept for Confucianism that is frequently given great

prominence in Confucian ethics. Drawing upon such approaches, I propose that at

least one aspect of l?&apos;s function is best understood as being bound-up with that of

r?n and that this function arguably justifies Confucian appeals to l? as a guide to

conduct. My approach is distinct from previous interpretations, however, in that I

argue that l? serves metaphorically as the language by which attitudes conducive to

r?n are managed and expressed, and that the successful application of l?, including

its use in symbolizing ethically significant normative statuses, contributes to the

Confucian ideal of harmony (h?, &#21644;) on both interpersonal and intrapersonal

levels. The upshot of this interpretation is that, despite criticisms both modern and

ancient, we can clearly see how the Confucians justifiably imbue a particular

aspect of traditional mores with normative ethical force.</description.abstract>
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