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Postgraduate Thesis: The problem of China: British writings on China in the 1920s
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TitleThe problem of China: British writings on China in the 1920s
 
AuthorsCheng, Po-ming, George.
鄭寶銘.
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
Abstract This dissertation examines the British conception of the problem of China in the 1920s, as reflected through political writings on the country. The focus of this study is on the texts of three authors: Bertrand Russell, Rodney Gilbert, and Arthur Ransome. Though coming from diverse traditions and drastically dissimilar political backgrounds, these writers, like many other British writers at the time, had come to view China as being essentially problematic – a view that is open to multiple interpretations, and perhaps deliberately so. Books with titles such as The Problem of China, The Chinese Puzzle, What’s Wrong with China, and Is China Mad?, to name a few, reveal a way of thinking about the country that was prevalent and well-entrenched. Demands for books on a problematic China reveal a desire, on the part of the British home audience, not only to gain a better understanding as to the constitution of problem, but also to appreciate how this Chinese problem can affect Britain, and how it can be resolved. What is interesting, however, upon examining these texts that seek to explicate the titular problem, is that one discovers that there is hardly a consensus among these This dissertation examines the British conception of the problem of China in the 1920s, as reflected through political writings on the country. The focus of this study is on the texts of three authors: Bertrand Russell, Rodney Gilbert, and Arthur Ransome. Though coming from diverse traditions and drastically dissimilar political backgrounds, these writers, like many other British writers at the time, had come to view China as being essentially problematic – a view that is open to multiple interpretations, and perhaps deliberately so. Books with titles such as The Problem of China, The Chinese Puzzle, What’s Wrong with China, and Is China Mad?, to name a few, reveal a way of thinking about the country that was prevalent and well-entrenched. Demands for books on a problematic China reveal a desire, on the part of the British home audience, not only to gain a better understanding as to the constitution of problem, but also to appreciate how this Chinese problem can affect Britain, and how it can be resolved. What is interesting, however, upon examining these texts that seek to explicate the titular problem, is that one discovers that there is hardly a consensus among these
 
AdvisorsGan, WCH
 
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
 
Dept/ProgramEnglish
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.advisorGan, WCH
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Po-ming, George.
 
dc.contributor.author鄭寶銘.
 
dc.date.hkucongregation2012
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstract This dissertation examines the British conception of the problem of China in the 1920s, as reflected through political writings on the country. The focus of this study is on the texts of three authors: Bertrand Russell, Rodney Gilbert, and Arthur Ransome. Though coming from diverse traditions and drastically dissimilar political backgrounds, these writers, like many other British writers at the time, had come to view China as being essentially problematic – a view that is open to multiple interpretations, and perhaps deliberately so. Books with titles such as The Problem of China, The Chinese Puzzle, What’s Wrong with China, and Is China Mad?, to name a few, reveal a way of thinking about the country that was prevalent and well-entrenched. Demands for books on a problematic China reveal a desire, on the part of the British home audience, not only to gain a better understanding as to the constitution of problem, but also to appreciate how this Chinese problem can affect Britain, and how it can be resolved. What is interesting, however, upon examining these texts that seek to explicate the titular problem, is that one discovers that there is hardly a consensus among these This dissertation examines the British conception of the problem of China in the 1920s, as reflected through political writings on the country. The focus of this study is on the texts of three authors: Bertrand Russell, Rodney Gilbert, and Arthur Ransome. Though coming from diverse traditions and drastically dissimilar political backgrounds, these writers, like many other British writers at the time, had come to view China as being essentially problematic – a view that is open to multiple interpretations, and perhaps deliberately so. Books with titles such as The Problem of China, The Chinese Puzzle, What’s Wrong with China, and Is China Mad?, to name a few, reveal a way of thinking about the country that was prevalent and well-entrenched. Demands for books on a problematic China reveal a desire, on the part of the British home audience, not only to gain a better understanding as to the constitution of problem, but also to appreciate how this Chinese problem can affect Britain, and how it can be resolved. What is interesting, however, upon examining these texts that seek to explicate the titular problem, is that one discovers that there is hardly a consensus among these
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEnglish
 
dc.description.thesislevelmaster's
 
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4807978
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48079789
 
dc.titleThe problem of China: British writings on China in the 1920s
 
dc.typePG_Thesis
 
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 This dissertation examines the British conception of the problem of China in the 1920s, as reflected through political writings on the country. The focus of this study is on the texts of three authors: Bertrand Russell, Rodney Gilbert, and Arthur Ransome. Though coming from diverse traditions and drastically dissimilar political backgrounds, these writers, like many other British writers at the time, had come to view China as being essentially problematic &#8211; a view that is open to multiple interpretations, and perhaps deliberately so. Books with titles such as The Problem of China, The Chinese Puzzle, What&#8217;s Wrong with China, and Is China Mad?, to name a few, reveal a way of thinking about the country that was prevalent and well-entrenched. Demands for books on a problematic China reveal a desire, on the part of the British home audience, not only to gain a better understanding as to the constitution of problem, but also to appreciate how this Chinese problem can affect Britain, and how it can be resolved. What is interesting, however, upon examining these texts that seek to explicate the titular problem, is that one discovers that there is hardly a consensus among these 

 This dissertation examines the British conception of the problem of China in the 1920s, as reflected through political writings on the country. The focus of this study is on the texts of three authors: Bertrand Russell, Rodney Gilbert, and Arthur Ransome. Though coming from diverse traditions and drastically dissimilar political backgrounds, these writers, like many other British writers at the time, had come to view China as being essentially problematic &#8211; a view that is open to multiple interpretations, and perhaps deliberately so. Books with titles such as The Problem of China, The Chinese Puzzle, What&#8217;s Wrong with China, and Is China Mad?, to name a few, reveal a way of thinking about the country that was prevalent and well-entrenched. Demands for books on a problematic China reveal a desire, on the part of the British home audience, not only to gain a better understanding as to the constitution of problem, but also to appreciate how this Chinese problem can affect Britain, and how it can be resolved. What is interesting, however, upon examining these texts that seek to explicate the titular problem, is that one discovers that there is hardly a consensus among these</description.abstract>
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