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postgraduate thesis: Feasibility, acceptability and utilization of a moblie cardiovascular risk factor profile e-platform amongst physicians and patients in HongKong

TitleFeasibility, acceptability and utilization of a moblie cardiovascular risk factor profile e-platform amongst physicians and patients in HongKong
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
AbstractStudy methods: Mixed-method study design was used to investigate feasibility of implementing a mobile-phone based behavioural intervention to reduce CVD risk factors among the Chinese population. Patients, who were 45-79 years old, fair English literacy, had access to a JAVA enabled mobile phone and had no mental health problems, cognitive impairment or severe illness, were eligible to the study. Intervention: Patients recruited from three settings (1 GP, 1 specialist and 1 public clinics) had the study software installed to their phone. The software enabled patients to access their CVD risk profiles (including weight, BP, HbA1c, and lipoprotein profile), 10-year CVD risk prediction (based on Framingham Cardiac Risk Score), and pre-set behavioural recommendations. Patients’ CVD risk profiles were updated at 1-month and 3-month follow-up when their test results were available. Patients were alerted with healthy behaviours recommendations. Outcomes: Outcomes were measured at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Clinical outcomes included Cardiac Risk Factor Score and its components (BMI, Systolic & Diastolic BP, total cholesterol, HDL and HbA1c). Two sets of questionnaires were used to measure knowledge, risk reduction behaviour and attitude toward usefulness of medical records (pre-intervention) and perceived ease of use, usefulness, satisfaction and utilisation of the software (post-intervention). Results and Discussion: 19 patients were recruited at baseline. 75% (14) aged 45-55 years, 58% (11) were male, 79% (15) had secondary or lower education, 63% (12) were married, and 95% (18) never smoked. Patients’ understanding about CVD risk factors and risk reduction behaviour was moderate. Patients’ attitude toward electronic medical record was positive. Overall patients’ perception of usefulness, ease of use and satisfaction with the software was satisfactory. Post-intervention, a decreasing trend was observed in patients’ CVD risk profiles i.e. weight, BMI, SBP&DBP, HbA1c and Lipoprotein profile. Focus group discussions revealed that there was a mismatch between physicians and patients perspectives about the use of mobile phone in a behavioural intervention. Physicians tended to express their concern about the quality of records, security of technology, and patients’ actual benefit, while patients showed little concern about security and great excitement about further use of mobile phone technology in assisting their disease self-management. The public sector physicians admitted that their patients were passive in term of seeking information about their health. Patients were willing to use this software for future care if it could provide more real-time data, tailored recommendations for behavioural change, and an interactive communication tool with their physicians. Physicians would like to try the software if it could ease patient-management process, especially enhance patient-physician communication, and be a decision support system to help them keep track with changes that their patients made. Conclusion: This pilot study has provided preliminary evidence of the feasibility, acceptability, and utility of an e-platform in primary interventions for CVD in Hong Kong.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectCardiovascular system - Diseases - Risk factors - Data processing.
Telecommunication in medicine.
Medical informatics.
Medical telematics.
Dept/ProgramCommunity Medicine

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVu, Manh Tuan.-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.description.abstractStudy methods: Mixed-method study design was used to investigate feasibility of implementing a mobile-phone based behavioural intervention to reduce CVD risk factors among the Chinese population. Patients, who were 45-79 years old, fair English literacy, had access to a JAVA enabled mobile phone and had no mental health problems, cognitive impairment or severe illness, were eligible to the study. Intervention: Patients recruited from three settings (1 GP, 1 specialist and 1 public clinics) had the study software installed to their phone. The software enabled patients to access their CVD risk profiles (including weight, BP, HbA1c, and lipoprotein profile), 10-year CVD risk prediction (based on Framingham Cardiac Risk Score), and pre-set behavioural recommendations. Patients’ CVD risk profiles were updated at 1-month and 3-month follow-up when their test results were available. Patients were alerted with healthy behaviours recommendations. Outcomes: Outcomes were measured at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Clinical outcomes included Cardiac Risk Factor Score and its components (BMI, Systolic & Diastolic BP, total cholesterol, HDL and HbA1c). Two sets of questionnaires were used to measure knowledge, risk reduction behaviour and attitude toward usefulness of medical records (pre-intervention) and perceived ease of use, usefulness, satisfaction and utilisation of the software (post-intervention). Results and Discussion: 19 patients were recruited at baseline. 75% (14) aged 45-55 years, 58% (11) were male, 79% (15) had secondary or lower education, 63% (12) were married, and 95% (18) never smoked. Patients’ understanding about CVD risk factors and risk reduction behaviour was moderate. Patients’ attitude toward electronic medical record was positive. Overall patients’ perception of usefulness, ease of use and satisfaction with the software was satisfactory. Post-intervention, a decreasing trend was observed in patients’ CVD risk profiles i.e. weight, BMI, SBP&DBP, HbA1c and Lipoprotein profile. Focus group discussions revealed that there was a mismatch between physicians and patients perspectives about the use of mobile phone in a behavioural intervention. Physicians tended to express their concern about the quality of records, security of technology, and patients’ actual benefit, while patients showed little concern about security and great excitement about further use of mobile phone technology in assisting their disease self-management. The public sector physicians admitted that their patients were passive in term of seeking information about their health. Patients were willing to use this software for future care if it could provide more real-time data, tailored recommendations for behavioural change, and an interactive communication tool with their physicians. Physicians would like to try the software if it could ease patient-management process, especially enhance patient-physician communication, and be a decision support system to help them keep track with changes that their patients made. Conclusion: This pilot study has provided preliminary evidence of the feasibility, acceptability, and utility of an e-platform in primary interventions for CVD in Hong Kong.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B47869823-
dc.subject.lcshCardiovascular system - Diseases - Risk factors - Data processing.-
dc.subject.lcshTelecommunication in medicine.-
dc.subject.lcshMedical informatics.-
dc.subject.lcshMedical telematics.-
dc.titleFeasibility, acceptability and utilization of a moblie cardiovascular risk factor profile e-platform amongst physicians and patients in HongKong-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4786982-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineCommunity Medicine-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4786982-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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