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postgraduate thesis: Surreal estate: Hong Kong's property sector and white-collar crime discourse: y Yujing Fun.

TitleSurreal estate: Hong Kong's property sector and white-collar crime discourse: y Yujing Fun.
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Abstract
It has been claimed by some that Hong Kong, the world’s freest economy, is without corruption or other kinds of white-collar crime. Statistical sources suggest that these crimes are indeed rare in the city. This study examined those claims by looking at the practices of Hong Kong’s real estate industry, specifically through the lens of a case study on 39 Conduit Road. The property development known as 39 Conduit Road became the centre of controversy in June 2010 when the developer, Henderson Land, was accused of market manipulation. The study found that many common practices in the real estate industry, such as intimidation and deception, could constitute an abuse of power by real estate developers. The abuse of power, especially when done in the course of an occupation, is a fundamental part of the sociological discourse of white-collar crime. The study concluded therefore that it was not that white-collar crime did not exist in Hong Kong but more that these behaviours were structurally rendered invisible. The study located the failure to observe these abuses in the city’s power structure where the local government used its economic policy of laissez faire to turn issues into non-issues, and in its legal culture where ambiguity in the law was construed as a right to act.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectWhite collar crimes - China - Hong Kong.
Real estate business - China - Hong Kong.
Dept/ProgramSociology

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFun, Yu-jing.-
dc.contributor.author范優晶.-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.description.abstractIt has been claimed by some that Hong Kong, the world’s freest economy, is without corruption or other kinds of white-collar crime. Statistical sources suggest that these crimes are indeed rare in the city. This study examined those claims by looking at the practices of Hong Kong’s real estate industry, specifically through the lens of a case study on 39 Conduit Road. The property development known as 39 Conduit Road became the centre of controversy in June 2010 when the developer, Henderson Land, was accused of market manipulation. The study found that many common practices in the real estate industry, such as intimidation and deception, could constitute an abuse of power by real estate developers. The abuse of power, especially when done in the course of an occupation, is a fundamental part of the sociological discourse of white-collar crime. The study concluded therefore that it was not that white-collar crime did not exist in Hong Kong but more that these behaviours were structurally rendered invisible. The study located the failure to observe these abuses in the city’s power structure where the local government used its economic policy of laissez faire to turn issues into non-issues, and in its legal culture where ambiguity in the law was construed as a right to act.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B47869525-
dc.subject.lcshWhite collar crimes - China - Hong Kong.-
dc.subject.lcshReal estate business - China - Hong Kong.-
dc.titleSurreal estate: Hong Kong's property sector and white-collar crime discourse: y Yujing Fun.-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4786952-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesisleveldoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineSociology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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