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Article: Crowding by invisible flankers

TitleCrowding by invisible flankers
Authors
KeywordsAwareness
Grating
Human experiment
Peripheral vision
Stimulus response
Issue Date2011
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2011, v. 6 n. 12 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Human object recognition degrades sharply as the target object moves from central vision into peripheral vision. In particular, one's ability to recognize a peripheral target is severely impaired by the presence of flanking objects, a phenomenon known as visual crowding. Recent studies on how visual awareness of flanker existence influences crowding had shown mixed results. More importantly, it is not known whether conscious awareness of the existence of both the target and flankers are necessary for crowding to occur. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we show that crowding persists even when people are completely unaware of the flankers, which are rendered invisible through the continuous flash suppression technique. Contrast threshold for identifying the orientation of a grating pattern was elevated in the flanked condition, even when the subjects reported that they were unaware of the perceptually suppressed flankers. Moreover, we find that orientation-specific adaptation is attenuated by flankers even when both the target and flankers are invisible. Conclusions: These findings complement the suggested correlation between crowding and visual awareness. What's more, our results demonstrate that conscious awareness and attention are not prerequisite for crowding. © 2011 Ho, Cheung.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161496
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, SHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-27T02:13:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-27T02:13:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2011, v. 6 n. 12en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161496-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Human object recognition degrades sharply as the target object moves from central vision into peripheral vision. In particular, one's ability to recognize a peripheral target is severely impaired by the presence of flanking objects, a phenomenon known as visual crowding. Recent studies on how visual awareness of flanker existence influences crowding had shown mixed results. More importantly, it is not known whether conscious awareness of the existence of both the target and flankers are necessary for crowding to occur. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we show that crowding persists even when people are completely unaware of the flankers, which are rendered invisible through the continuous flash suppression technique. Contrast threshold for identifying the orientation of a grating pattern was elevated in the flanked condition, even when the subjects reported that they were unaware of the perceptually suppressed flankers. Moreover, we find that orientation-specific adaptation is attenuated by flankers even when both the target and flankers are invisible. Conclusions: These findings complement the suggested correlation between crowding and visual awareness. What's more, our results demonstrate that conscious awareness and attention are not prerequisite for crowding. © 2011 Ho, Cheung.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAwareness-
dc.subjectGrating-
dc.subjectHuman experiment-
dc.subjectPeripheral vision-
dc.subjectStimulus response-
dc.titleCrowding by invisible flankersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, C: cristyho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, SH: singhang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, C=rp00859en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, SH=rp00590en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0028814en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22194919-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3237546-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-83355170600en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros206517-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-83355170600&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000298369100103-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, C=8697555100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, SH=7202473508en_HK

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