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Article: An intervention to reduce alcohol consumption in undergraduate students using implementation intentions and mental simulations: A cross-national study

TitleAn intervention to reduce alcohol consumption in undergraduate students using implementation intentions and mental simulations: A cross-national study
Authors
KeywordsBinge Drinking
Implementation Intention
Mental Simulations
Planned Behavior
Issue Date2012
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12529
Citation
International Journal Of Behavioral Medicine, 2012, v. 19 n. 1, p. 82-96 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Excessive alcohol consumption has been linked to deleterious health consequences among undergraduate students. There is a need to develop theory-based and cost-effective brief interventions to attenuate alcohol consumption in this population. Purpose The present study tested the effectiveness of an integrated theory-based intervention in reducing undergraduates' alcohol consumption in excess of guideline limits in national samples from Estonia, Finland, and the UK. Method A 2 (volitional: implementation intention vs. no implementation intention)×2 (motivation: mental simulation vs. no mental simulation)×3 (nationality: Estonia vs. Finland vs. UK) randomized-controlled design was adopted. Participants completed baseline psychological measures and self-reported number of alcohol units consumed and binge-drinking frequency followed by the intervention manipulation. One month later, participants completed follow-up measures of the psychological variables and alcohol consumption. Results Results revealed main effects for implementation intention and nationality on units of alcohol consumed at follow-up and an implementation intention×nationality interaction. Alcohol consumption was significantly reduced in the implementation intention condition for the Estonian and UK samples. There was a significant main effect for nationality and an implementation intention×nationality interaction on binge-drinking frequency. Follow-up tests revealed significant reductions in binge-drinking occasions in the implementation intention group for the UK sample only. Conclusion Results support the implementation intention component of the intervention in reducing alcohol drinking in excess of guideline limits among Estonian and UK undergraduates. There was no support for the motivational intervention or the interaction between the strategies. Results are discussed with respect to intervention design based on motivational and volitional approaches. © International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2010.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161403
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.872
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.905
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLonsdale, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoka, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorHein, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorPasi, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLintunen, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:31:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:31:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Behavioral Medicine, 2012, v. 19 n. 1, p. 82-96en_US
dc.identifier.issn1070-5503en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161403-
dc.description.abstractBackground Excessive alcohol consumption has been linked to deleterious health consequences among undergraduate students. There is a need to develop theory-based and cost-effective brief interventions to attenuate alcohol consumption in this population. Purpose The present study tested the effectiveness of an integrated theory-based intervention in reducing undergraduates' alcohol consumption in excess of guideline limits in national samples from Estonia, Finland, and the UK. Method A 2 (volitional: implementation intention vs. no implementation intention)×2 (motivation: mental simulation vs. no mental simulation)×3 (nationality: Estonia vs. Finland vs. UK) randomized-controlled design was adopted. Participants completed baseline psychological measures and self-reported number of alcohol units consumed and binge-drinking frequency followed by the intervention manipulation. One month later, participants completed follow-up measures of the psychological variables and alcohol consumption. Results Results revealed main effects for implementation intention and nationality on units of alcohol consumed at follow-up and an implementation intention×nationality interaction. Alcohol consumption was significantly reduced in the implementation intention condition for the Estonian and UK samples. There was a significant main effect for nationality and an implementation intention×nationality interaction on binge-drinking frequency. Follow-up tests revealed significant reductions in binge-drinking occasions in the implementation intention group for the UK sample only. Conclusion Results support the implementation intention component of the intervention in reducing alcohol drinking in excess of guideline limits among Estonian and UK undergraduates. There was no support for the motivational intervention or the interaction between the strategies. Results are discussed with respect to intervention design based on motivational and volitional approaches. © International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2010.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12529en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicineen_US
dc.subjectBinge Drinkingen_US
dc.subjectImplementation Intentionen_US
dc.subjectMental Simulationsen_US
dc.subjectPlanned Behavioren_US
dc.titleAn intervention to reduce alcohol consumption in undergraduate students using implementation intentions and mental simulations: A cross-national studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12529-011-9163-8en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21562782-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863785573en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84863785573&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage82en_US
dc.identifier.epage96en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000300160000010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLonsdale, A=37120550100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKoka, A=8543636800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHein, V=6603362315en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPasi, H=37120752100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLintunen, T=6602323322en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9329756-

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