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Article: The effectiveness of a motivational interviewing primary-care based intervention on physical activity and predictors of change in a disadvantaged community

TitleThe effectiveness of a motivational interviewing primary-care based intervention on physical activity and predictors of change in a disadvantaged community
Authors
KeywordsMotivational Interviewing Physical Activity Primary Care Socio-Economic Status Behavior Change Health Promotion
Issue Date2012
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0160-7715
Citation
Journal Of Behavioral Medicine, 2012, v. 35 n. 3, p. 318-333 How to Cite?
AbstractLittle research exists on the impact of behavior change interventions in disadvantaged communities. We conducted a prospective study to explore the effectiveness of motivational interviewing on physical activity change within a deprived community and the social-psychological and motivational predictors of change in physical activity including stage of change, self-efficacy, social support, and variables from self-determination theory and the theory of planned behavior. Five motivational interviewing counsellors recruited 207 patients and offered motivational interviewing sessions to support physical activity behavior change. At 6-months there were significant improvements in physical activity, stage of change, and social support. A dose-response relationship was evident; those who attended 2 or more consultations increased their total physical activity, stage of change and family social support more than those who attended just one. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that number of sessions and change in stage of change predicted 28.4 % of the variance in change in total physical activity and, with social support from friends, 21.0 % of the variance in change walking time. Change in perceived behavioral control and attitudes, friend social support, and number of sessions predicted 16.8 % of the variance in change in vigorous physical activity. Motivational interviewing is an effective approach for promoting physical activity amongst lower socio-economic status groups in the short term. The study demonstrates good translational efficacy, and contributes to a limited number of physical activity interventions targeting low income groups in the UK. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161402
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.227
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.069
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHardcastle, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlake, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:31:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:31:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Behavioral Medicine, 2012, v. 35 n. 3, p. 318-333en_US
dc.identifier.issn0160-7715en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161402-
dc.description.abstractLittle research exists on the impact of behavior change interventions in disadvantaged communities. We conducted a prospective study to explore the effectiveness of motivational interviewing on physical activity change within a deprived community and the social-psychological and motivational predictors of change in physical activity including stage of change, self-efficacy, social support, and variables from self-determination theory and the theory of planned behavior. Five motivational interviewing counsellors recruited 207 patients and offered motivational interviewing sessions to support physical activity behavior change. At 6-months there were significant improvements in physical activity, stage of change, and social support. A dose-response relationship was evident; those who attended 2 or more consultations increased their total physical activity, stage of change and family social support more than those who attended just one. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that number of sessions and change in stage of change predicted 28.4 % of the variance in change in total physical activity and, with social support from friends, 21.0 % of the variance in change walking time. Change in perceived behavioral control and attitudes, friend social support, and number of sessions predicted 16.8 % of the variance in change in vigorous physical activity. Motivational interviewing is an effective approach for promoting physical activity amongst lower socio-economic status groups in the short term. The study demonstrates good translational efficacy, and contributes to a limited number of physical activity interventions targeting low income groups in the UK. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0160-7715en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Behavioral Medicineen_US
dc.subjectMotivational Interviewing Physical Activity Primary Care Socio-Economic Status Behavior Change Health Promotionen_US
dc.titleThe effectiveness of a motivational interviewing primary-care based intervention on physical activity and predictors of change in a disadvantaged communityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10865-012-9417-1en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22476812-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863775242en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84863775242&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume35en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage318en_US
dc.identifier.epage333en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303865700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHardcastle, S=7003333859en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBlake, N=55158640100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10562341-

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