File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Predicting alcohol consumption and binge drinking in company employees: An application of planned behaviour and self-determination theories

TitlePredicting alcohol consumption and binge drinking in company employees: An application of planned behaviour and self-determination theories
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jHH_1.cfm
Citation
British Journal Of Health Psychology, 2012, v. 17 n. 2, p. 379-407 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives. This study tested an integrated model of the psychosocial determinants of alcohol-related behaviour among company employees from four nations. A motivational sequence was proposed in which motivational orientations from self-determination theory influenced intentions to consume alcohol within guideline limits and alcohol-related behaviour via the mediation of the theory of planned behaviour variables of attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioural control (PBC). Design. A three-wave prospective design using self-reported psychological and behavioural measures. Methods. Company employees (N= 486, males = 225, females = 261; M age = 30.41, SD= 8.31) from four nations (Estonia, Finland, Sweden, and UK) completed measures of autonomous and controlled motivation from self-determination theory, attitudes, subjective norms, PBC, intentions from the theory of planned behaviour, and self-reported measures of past alcohol consumption and binge-drinking occasions at the first time point (time 1). Follow-up psychological and behavioural measures were taken one month later (time 2) and follow-up behavioural measures taken a further 2 months later (time 3). Results. Path analyses supported the motivational sequence with identified regulation (time 1), predicting intentions (time 1), and alcohol units consumed (time 2). The effects were indirect via the mediation of attitudes and PBC (time 1). A similar pattern of effects was found for the effect of time 2 psychological variables on time 3 units of alcohol consumed. There was little support for the effects of the psychological variables on binge-drinking behaviour. Conclusions. Findings provide new information on the psychosocial determinants of alcohol behaviour in company employees and the processes involved. Results may provide impetus for the development of interventions to reduce alcohol consumption. © 2011 The British Psychological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161398
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.895
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.322
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLonsdale, AJen_US
dc.contributor.authorHein, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorKoka, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorLintunen, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorPasi, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLindwall, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorRudolfsson, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:31:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:31:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Health Psychology, 2012, v. 17 n. 2, p. 379-407en_US
dc.identifier.issn1359-107Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161398-
dc.description.abstractObjectives. This study tested an integrated model of the psychosocial determinants of alcohol-related behaviour among company employees from four nations. A motivational sequence was proposed in which motivational orientations from self-determination theory influenced intentions to consume alcohol within guideline limits and alcohol-related behaviour via the mediation of the theory of planned behaviour variables of attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioural control (PBC). Design. A three-wave prospective design using self-reported psychological and behavioural measures. Methods. Company employees (N= 486, males = 225, females = 261; M age = 30.41, SD= 8.31) from four nations (Estonia, Finland, Sweden, and UK) completed measures of autonomous and controlled motivation from self-determination theory, attitudes, subjective norms, PBC, intentions from the theory of planned behaviour, and self-reported measures of past alcohol consumption and binge-drinking occasions at the first time point (time 1). Follow-up psychological and behavioural measures were taken one month later (time 2) and follow-up behavioural measures taken a further 2 months later (time 3). Results. Path analyses supported the motivational sequence with identified regulation (time 1), predicting intentions (time 1), and alcohol units consumed (time 2). The effects were indirect via the mediation of attitudes and PBC (time 1). A similar pattern of effects was found for the effect of time 2 psychological variables on time 3 units of alcohol consumed. There was little support for the effects of the psychological variables on binge-drinking behaviour. Conclusions. Findings provide new information on the psychosocial determinants of alcohol behaviour in company employees and the processes involved. Results may provide impetus for the development of interventions to reduce alcohol consumption. © 2011 The British Psychological Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jHH_1.cfmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Health Psychologyen_US
dc.titlePredicting alcohol consumption and binge drinking in company employees: An application of planned behaviour and self-determination theoriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.2044-8287.2011.02043.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid22106875-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84858051522en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84858051522&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage379en_US
dc.identifier.epage407en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000301175800010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLonsdale, AJ=37120550100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHein, V=6603362315en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKoka, A=8543636800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLintunen, T=6602323322en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPasi, H=37120752100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLindwall, M=8365303000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRudolfsson, L=25633040300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats