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Article: The trans-contextual model: perceived learning and performance motivational climates as analogues of perceived autonomy support

TitleThe trans-contextual model: perceived learning and performance motivational climates as analogues of perceived autonomy support
Authors
KeywordsAutonomous Motivation
Leisure-Time Physical Activity
Motivational Climate
Physical Education
Issue Date2013
PublisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/psychology/child+%26+school+psychology/journal/10212
Citation
European Journal Of Psychology Of Education, 2013, v. 28 n. 2, p. 353-372 How to Cite?
AbstractThe trans-contextual model of motivation (TCM) proposes that perceived autonomy support in physical education (PE) predicts autonomous motivation within this context, which, in turn, is related to autonomous motivation and physical activity in leisure-time. According to achievement goal theory perceptions of learning and performance, motivational climate in PE can also affect autonomous motivation in PE. The purpose of the present study was to examine the influence of an integrated approach of perceptions of motivational climate in PE by incorporating aspects of perceptions of motivational climate from achievement goal frameworks on autonomous motivation in PE within the TCM. High school students (N = 274) completed self-report measures of perceived autonomy support, perceived learning, and performance motivational climate and autonomous motivation in PE. Follow-up measures of autonomous motivation in a leisure-time context were taken along with measures of attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and intentions from the theory of planned behaviour 1 week later. Self-reported physical activity behaviour was measured 5 weeks later. The results of the path analyses indicated that perceived learning climate was the strongest predictor of autonomous motivation in PE and leisure-time contexts and mediated the effect of perceived autonomy support on autonomous motivation in PE. Perceived performance climate showed no significant effect on autonomous motivation in PE and leisure-time. Results also confirmed the premises of TCM regarding the effect of autonomous motivation in leisure-time on leisure-time physical activity and the mediating role of the planned behaviour theory variables. © 2012 Instituto Superior de Psicologia Aplicada, Lisboa, Portugal and Springer Science+Business Media BV.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161397
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.008
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.628
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBarkoukis, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:31:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:31:07Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Psychology Of Education, 2013, v. 28 n. 2, p. 353-372en_US
dc.identifier.issn0256-2928en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161397-
dc.description.abstractThe trans-contextual model of motivation (TCM) proposes that perceived autonomy support in physical education (PE) predicts autonomous motivation within this context, which, in turn, is related to autonomous motivation and physical activity in leisure-time. According to achievement goal theory perceptions of learning and performance, motivational climate in PE can also affect autonomous motivation in PE. The purpose of the present study was to examine the influence of an integrated approach of perceptions of motivational climate in PE by incorporating aspects of perceptions of motivational climate from achievement goal frameworks on autonomous motivation in PE within the TCM. High school students (N = 274) completed self-report measures of perceived autonomy support, perceived learning, and performance motivational climate and autonomous motivation in PE. Follow-up measures of autonomous motivation in a leisure-time context were taken along with measures of attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and intentions from the theory of planned behaviour 1 week later. Self-reported physical activity behaviour was measured 5 weeks later. The results of the path analyses indicated that perceived learning climate was the strongest predictor of autonomous motivation in PE and leisure-time contexts and mediated the effect of perceived autonomy support on autonomous motivation in PE. Perceived performance climate showed no significant effect on autonomous motivation in PE and leisure-time. Results also confirmed the premises of TCM regarding the effect of autonomous motivation in leisure-time on leisure-time physical activity and the mediating role of the planned behaviour theory variables. © 2012 Instituto Superior de Psicologia Aplicada, Lisboa, Portugal and Springer Science+Business Media BV.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/psychology/child+%26+school+psychology/journal/10212en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Psychology of Educationen_US
dc.subjectAutonomous Motivationen_US
dc.subjectLeisure-Time Physical Activityen_US
dc.subjectMotivational Climateen_US
dc.subjectPhysical Educationen_US
dc.titleThe trans-contextual model: perceived learning and performance motivational climates as analogues of perceived autonomy supporten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10212-012-0118-5en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84882451849en_US
dc.identifier.spage353en_US
dc.identifier.epage372en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000318367000012-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarkoukis, V=6603016227en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US

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