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Article: Effectiveness of a brief intervention using mental simulations in reducing alcohol consumption in corporate employees

TitleEffectiveness of a brief intervention using mental simulations in reducing alcohol consumption in corporate employees
Authors
KeywordsBinge Drinking
Mental Simulations
Planned Behaviour
Workplace
Issue Date2011
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13548506.asp
Citation
Psychology, Health And Medicine, 2011, v. 16 n. 4, p. 375-392 How to Cite?
AbstractA theory-based intervention aimed at reducing corporate employees' alcohol consumption in excess of guideline limits is presented. The intervention adopted an outcome mental simulation technique and was administered to a sample of corporate employees from three companies. A single-arm randomized-controlled design was adopted. All participants completed baseline psychological measures and self-reported number of alcohol units consumed and binge-drinking occasions. Participants allocated to the intervention condition were presented with a mental simulation exercise. One month later, participants completed follow-up measures of the psychological variables and alcohol consumption. Results revealed a significant effect of the mental simulation intervention on number of units of alcohol consumed at follow-up. There was no effect of the intervention on frequency of binge-drinking occasions. There was no evidence for the mediation of the effect of mental simulations on alcohol consumption by the perceived behavioural control and motivation variables. Results support the efficacy of the mental simulation intervention in reducing alcohol consumption but not in reducing binge drinking or alcohol consumption in excess of guideline limits, among corporate employees. Results are discussed with respect to the importance of the mental simulation intervention to inform practice and the proposed processes by which mental simulations affect alcohol consumption. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161387
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.347
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.581
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLonsdale, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:31:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:31:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychology, Health And Medicine, 2011, v. 16 n. 4, p. 375-392en_US
dc.identifier.issn1354-8506en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161387-
dc.description.abstractA theory-based intervention aimed at reducing corporate employees' alcohol consumption in excess of guideline limits is presented. The intervention adopted an outcome mental simulation technique and was administered to a sample of corporate employees from three companies. A single-arm randomized-controlled design was adopted. All participants completed baseline psychological measures and self-reported number of alcohol units consumed and binge-drinking occasions. Participants allocated to the intervention condition were presented with a mental simulation exercise. One month later, participants completed follow-up measures of the psychological variables and alcohol consumption. Results revealed a significant effect of the mental simulation intervention on number of units of alcohol consumed at follow-up. There was no effect of the intervention on frequency of binge-drinking occasions. There was no evidence for the mediation of the effect of mental simulations on alcohol consumption by the perceived behavioural control and motivation variables. Results support the efficacy of the mental simulation intervention in reducing alcohol consumption but not in reducing binge drinking or alcohol consumption in excess of guideline limits, among corporate employees. Results are discussed with respect to the importance of the mental simulation intervention to inform practice and the proposed processes by which mental simulations affect alcohol consumption. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13548506.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology, Health and Medicineen_US
dc.subjectBinge Drinkingen_US
dc.subjectMental Simulationsen_US
dc.subjectPlanned Behaviouren_US
dc.subjectWorkplaceen_US
dc.titleEffectiveness of a brief intervention using mental simulations in reducing alcohol consumption in corporate employeesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13548506.2011.554568en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21749236-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960668195en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960668195&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume16en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage375en_US
dc.identifier.epage392en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299626100001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLonsdale, A=37120550100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US

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