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Article: "You Can't Do It on Your Own" Experiences of a motivational interviewing intervention on physical activity and dietary behaviour

Title"You Can't Do It on Your Own" Experiences of a motivational interviewing intervention on physical activity and dietary behaviour
Authors
KeywordsBehaviour Change
Counselling
Diet
Physical Activity
Primary Care
Issue Date2011
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsport
Citation
Psychology Of Sport And Exercise, 2011, v. 12 n. 3, p. 314-323 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: While obesity is on the increase, interventions that seek to change physical activity or dietary behaviour tend to have limited success in the long-term. Consistently effective approaches for facilitating lifestyle change within primary health care settings are yet to be determined. Despite an increase in counselling interventions, little is known about how such interventions are received. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of obese patients, following participation in a counselling intervention, in order to identify the influences on behaviour change in relation to physical activity and diet. Design: A qualitative semi-structured interview study using inductive thematic content analysis. Methods: Fourteen overweight or obese patients participated in semi-structured interviews that focused on experiences of consultations; current physical activity and eating behaviour; facilitators and barriers to change. Results: Analysis of the interview transcripts revealed four themes that appeared to account for current lifestyle behaviour: (1) Monitoring and support; (2) Listening support; (3) Motivation and self-regulation; and (4) Barriers. Conclusions: Extended contact and support were deemed necessary for these patients. Interventions within primary care that are high intensity, with extended contact, and adopt an autonomy-supportive counselling style need development and evaluation. Such interventions should also focus on building self-regulation skills and strategies to overcome potential barriers to weight loss efforts. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161383
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.605
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.303
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHardcastle, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:31:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:31:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychology Of Sport And Exercise, 2011, v. 12 n. 3, p. 314-323en_US
dc.identifier.issn1469-0292en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161383-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: While obesity is on the increase, interventions that seek to change physical activity or dietary behaviour tend to have limited success in the long-term. Consistently effective approaches for facilitating lifestyle change within primary health care settings are yet to be determined. Despite an increase in counselling interventions, little is known about how such interventions are received. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of obese patients, following participation in a counselling intervention, in order to identify the influences on behaviour change in relation to physical activity and diet. Design: A qualitative semi-structured interview study using inductive thematic content analysis. Methods: Fourteen overweight or obese patients participated in semi-structured interviews that focused on experiences of consultations; current physical activity and eating behaviour; facilitators and barriers to change. Results: Analysis of the interview transcripts revealed four themes that appeared to account for current lifestyle behaviour: (1) Monitoring and support; (2) Listening support; (3) Motivation and self-regulation; and (4) Barriers. Conclusions: Extended contact and support were deemed necessary for these patients. Interventions within primary care that are high intensity, with extended contact, and adopt an autonomy-supportive counselling style need development and evaluation. Such interventions should also focus on building self-regulation skills and strategies to overcome potential barriers to weight loss efforts. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsporten_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology of Sport and Exerciseen_US
dc.subjectBehaviour Changeen_US
dc.subjectCounsellingen_US
dc.subjectDieten_US
dc.subjectPhysical Activityen_US
dc.subjectPrimary Careen_US
dc.title"You Can't Do It on Your Own" Experiences of a motivational interviewing intervention on physical activity and dietary behaviouren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychsport.2011.01.001en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79955006410en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79955006410&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage314en_US
dc.identifier.epage323en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291136500015-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHardcastle, S=7003333859en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike8674904-

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