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Article: Testing an integrated model of the theory of planned behaviour and self-determination theory for different energy balance-related behaviours and intervention intensities

TitleTesting an integrated model of the theory of planned behaviour and self-determination theory for different energy balance-related behaviours and intervention intensities
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jHH_1.cfm
Citation
British Journal Of Health Psychology, 2011, v. 16 n. 1, p. 113-134 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives The aim of the study was to test the relations between constructs from the self-determination theory (autonomous and controlled motivation), the theory of planned behaviour (attitudes, self-efficacy, and intentions), and behaviour change within a theoretically integrated model. Additionally, the aim was to test if these relations vary by behaviour (physical activity or dietary behaviour) or intervention intensity (frequency). Design. It was a randomized controlled trial with a 'usual care' condition (medical screening only) and an intervention condition (medical screening+access to a website and coaching). Participants in the latter condition could freely determine their own intervention intensity. Methods. Participants (N= 287) completed measures of the theoretical constructs and behaviour at baseline and after the first intervention year (N= 236). Partial least squares path modelling was used. Results. Changes in autonomous motivation positively predicted changes in self-efficacy and intentions towards a healthy diet. Changes in controlled motivation positively predicted changes in attitudes towards physical activity, changes in self-efficacy, and changes in behavioural intentions. The intervention intensity moderated the effect of self-efficacy on intentions towards physical activity and the relationship between attitude and physical activity. Changes in physical activity were positively predicted by changes in intentions whereas desired changes in fat intake were negatively predicted by the intervention intensity. Conclusions Important relations within the theoretically integrated model were confirmed but others were not. Moderation effects were found for behaviour and intervention intensity. © 2010 The British Psychological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161377
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.895
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.322
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorStreukens, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Bourdeaudhuij, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorClaes, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Health Psychology, 2011, v. 16 n. 1, p. 113-134en_US
dc.identifier.issn1359-107Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161377-
dc.description.abstractObjectives The aim of the study was to test the relations between constructs from the self-determination theory (autonomous and controlled motivation), the theory of planned behaviour (attitudes, self-efficacy, and intentions), and behaviour change within a theoretically integrated model. Additionally, the aim was to test if these relations vary by behaviour (physical activity or dietary behaviour) or intervention intensity (frequency). Design. It was a randomized controlled trial with a 'usual care' condition (medical screening only) and an intervention condition (medical screening+access to a website and coaching). Participants in the latter condition could freely determine their own intervention intensity. Methods. Participants (N= 287) completed measures of the theoretical constructs and behaviour at baseline and after the first intervention year (N= 236). Partial least squares path modelling was used. Results. Changes in autonomous motivation positively predicted changes in self-efficacy and intentions towards a healthy diet. Changes in controlled motivation positively predicted changes in attitudes towards physical activity, changes in self-efficacy, and changes in behavioural intentions. The intervention intensity moderated the effect of self-efficacy on intentions towards physical activity and the relationship between attitude and physical activity. Changes in physical activity were positively predicted by changes in intentions whereas desired changes in fat intake were negatively predicted by the intervention intensity. Conclusions Important relations within the theoretically integrated model were confirmed but others were not. Moderation effects were found for behaviour and intervention intensity. © 2010 The British Psychological Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jHH_1.cfmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Health Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshDiet - Methods - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEnergy Intakeen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIntentionen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshMotivationen_US
dc.subject.meshMotor Activityen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Education As Topic - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonal Autonomyen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Efficacyen_US
dc.titleTesting an integrated model of the theory of planned behaviour and self-determination theory for different energy balance-related behaviours and intervention intensitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1348/135910710X519305en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21226787-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79951644524en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79951644524&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume16en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage113en_US
dc.identifier.epage134en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000286956600007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJacobs, N=22950760400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStreukens, S=6506978555en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Bourdeaudhuij, I=35510873600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridClaes, N=8866266700en_US

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