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Article: Pre-hurricane perceived social support protects against psychological distress: A longitudinal analysis of low-income mothers

TitlePre-hurricane perceived social support protects against psychological distress: A longitudinal analysis of low-income mothers
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/ccp.html
Citation
Journal Of Consulting And Clinical Psychology, 2010, v. 78 n. 4, p. 551-560 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: In this study, we examined the influence of pre-disaster perceived social support on post-disaster psychological distress among survivors of Hurricane Katrina. Method: Participants (N = 386) were low-income mothers between 18 and 34 years of age at baseline (M = 26.4, SD = 4.43). The majority (84.8) was African American; 10.4 identified as Caucasian, 3.2 identified as Hispanic, and 1.8 identified as other. Participants were enrolled in an educational intervention study in 2004 and 2005. Those who had completed a 1-year follow-up assessment prior to Hurricane Katrina were reassessed approximately 1 year after the hurricane. Measures of perceived social support and psychological distress were included in pre- and post-disaster assessments. Using structural equation modeling and multiple mediator analysis, we tested a model wherein pre-disaster perceived social support predicted post-disaster psychological distress both directly and indirectly through its effects on pre-disaster psychological distress, exposure to hurricane-related stressors, and post-disaster perceived social support. We predicted that higher pre-disaster perceived social support would be predictive of lower pre-disaster psychological distress, lower hurricane-related stressors, and higher post-disaster perceived social support, and that these variables would, in turn, predict lower post-disaster psychologically distress. Results: Our analyses provide partial support for the hypothesized model. Although pre-disaster perceived social support did not exert a direct effect on post-disaster psychological distress, the indirect effects of all 3 proposed mediators were significant. Conclusions: Pre-disaster social support can decrease both exposure to natural disasters and the negative psychological effects of natural disaster exposure. These findings underscore the importance of bolstering the post-disaster social support networks of low-income mothers. © 2010 American Psychological Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161368
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.713
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.073
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLowe, SRen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CSen_US
dc.contributor.authorRhodes, JEen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:56Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Consulting And Clinical Psychology, 2010, v. 78 n. 4, p. 551-560en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-006Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161368-
dc.description.abstractObjective: In this study, we examined the influence of pre-disaster perceived social support on post-disaster psychological distress among survivors of Hurricane Katrina. Method: Participants (N = 386) were low-income mothers between 18 and 34 years of age at baseline (M = 26.4, SD = 4.43). The majority (84.8) was African American; 10.4 identified as Caucasian, 3.2 identified as Hispanic, and 1.8 identified as other. Participants were enrolled in an educational intervention study in 2004 and 2005. Those who had completed a 1-year follow-up assessment prior to Hurricane Katrina were reassessed approximately 1 year after the hurricane. Measures of perceived social support and psychological distress were included in pre- and post-disaster assessments. Using structural equation modeling and multiple mediator analysis, we tested a model wherein pre-disaster perceived social support predicted post-disaster psychological distress both directly and indirectly through its effects on pre-disaster psychological distress, exposure to hurricane-related stressors, and post-disaster perceived social support. We predicted that higher pre-disaster perceived social support would be predictive of lower pre-disaster psychological distress, lower hurricane-related stressors, and higher post-disaster perceived social support, and that these variables would, in turn, predict lower post-disaster psychologically distress. Results: Our analyses provide partial support for the hypothesized model. Although pre-disaster perceived social support did not exert a direct effect on post-disaster psychological distress, the indirect effects of all 3 proposed mediators were significant. Conclusions: Pre-disaster social support can decrease both exposure to natural disasters and the negative psychological effects of natural disaster exposure. These findings underscore the importance of bolstering the post-disaster social support networks of low-income mothers. © 2010 American Psychological Association.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/ccp.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAfrican Americans - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCyclonic Stormsen_US
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Group - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshMothers - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Assessment - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshPoverty - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychometricsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten_US
dc.subject.meshStress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - Ethnology - Psychology - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titlePre-hurricane perceived social support protects against psychological distress: A longitudinal analysis of low-income mothersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CS:shaunlyn@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CS=rp01645en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0018317en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20658811-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3618961-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955504343en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77955504343&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume78en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage551en_US
dc.identifier.epage560en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1939-2117-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000280823100010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLowe, SR=23135269800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CS=25645984800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRhodes, JE=7402364800en_US

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