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Article: Ego Depletion and the Strength Model of Self-Control: A Meta-Analysis

TitleEgo Depletion and the Strength Model of Self-Control: A Meta-Analysis
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/bul.html
Citation
Psychological Bulletin, 2010, v. 136 n. 4, p. 495-525 How to Cite?
AbstractAccording to the strength model, self-control is a finite resource that determines capacity for effortful control over dominant responses and, once expended, leads to impaired self-control task performance, known as ego depletion. A meta-analysis of 83 studies tested the effect of ego depletion on task performance and related outcomes, alternative explanations and moderators of the effect, and additional strength model hypotheses. Results revealed a significant effect of ego depletion on self-control task performance. Significant effect sizes were found for ego depletion on effort, perceived difficulty, negative affect, subjective fatigue, and blood glucose levels. Small, nonsignificant effects were found for positive affect and self-efficacy. Moderator analyses indicated minimal variation in the effect across sphere of depleting and dependent task, frequently used depleting and dependent tasks, presentation of tasks as single or separate experiments, type of dependent measure and control condition task, and source laboratory. The effect size was moderated by depleting task duration, task presentation by the same or different experimenters, intertask interim period, dependent task complexity, and use of dependent tasks in the choice and volition and cognitive spheres. Motivational incentives, training on self-control tasks, and glucose supplementation promoted better self-control in ego-depleted samples. Expecting further acts of self-control exacerbated the effect. Findings provide preliminary support for the ego-depletion effect and strength model hypotheses. Support for motivation and fatigue as alternative explanations for ego depletion indicate a need to integrate the strength model with other theories. Findings provide impetus for future investigation testing additional hypotheses and mechanisms of the ego-depletion effect. © 2010 American Psychological Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161366
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 14.839
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 8.106
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorWood, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorStiff, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:55Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Bulletin, 2010, v. 136 n. 4, p. 495-525en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2909en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161366-
dc.description.abstractAccording to the strength model, self-control is a finite resource that determines capacity for effortful control over dominant responses and, once expended, leads to impaired self-control task performance, known as ego depletion. A meta-analysis of 83 studies tested the effect of ego depletion on task performance and related outcomes, alternative explanations and moderators of the effect, and additional strength model hypotheses. Results revealed a significant effect of ego depletion on self-control task performance. Significant effect sizes were found for ego depletion on effort, perceived difficulty, negative affect, subjective fatigue, and blood glucose levels. Small, nonsignificant effects were found for positive affect and self-efficacy. Moderator analyses indicated minimal variation in the effect across sphere of depleting and dependent task, frequently used depleting and dependent tasks, presentation of tasks as single or separate experiments, type of dependent measure and control condition task, and source laboratory. The effect size was moderated by depleting task duration, task presentation by the same or different experimenters, intertask interim period, dependent task complexity, and use of dependent tasks in the choice and volition and cognitive spheres. Motivational incentives, training on self-control tasks, and glucose supplementation promoted better self-control in ego-depleted samples. Expecting further acts of self-control exacerbated the effect. Findings provide preliminary support for the ego-depletion effect and strength model hypotheses. Support for motivation and fatigue as alternative explanations for ego depletion indicate a need to integrate the strength model with other theories. Findings provide impetus for future investigation testing additional hypotheses and mechanisms of the ego-depletion effect. © 2010 American Psychological Association.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/bul.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Bulletinen_US
dc.subject.meshEgoen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInternal-External Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten_US
dc.subject.meshTask Performance And Analysisen_US
dc.titleEgo Depletion and the Strength Model of Self-Control: A Meta-Analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0019486en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20565167-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954162124en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954162124&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume136en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage495en_US
dc.identifier.epage525en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000279187100004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWood, C=35724903000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStiff, C=16070708800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9324841-

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