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Article: The strength model of self-regulation failure and health-related behaviour

TitleThe strength model of self-regulation failure and health-related behaviour
Authors
KeywordsBehaviour Change
Ego-Depletion
Energy
Limited Resource
Mental Fatigue
Self-Control
Issue Date2009
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17437199.asp
Citation
Health Psychology Review, 2009, v. 3 n. 2, p. 208-238 How to Cite?
AbstractSuccessful self-regulation is associated with adherence to health-related behaviour in many domains. In contrast, self-regulatory failure is linked to poor adherence and drop-out. This review presents the strength model of self-control as a framework to explain self-regulation in health-related behaviour contexts. In the model, self-regulation is conceptualised as a limited resource that once depleted results in reduced capacity to further regulate the self. We provide an overview of the hypotheses of the strength model and review research applying the model to self-regulation in four health-related behaviour domains: dietary restraint and eating behaviour, alcohol consumption, smoking cessation and physical activity. Based on our review, we recommend practitioners adopt strategies to minimise self-regulatory failure in people engaging in health-related behaviours such as minimising demands on self-control resources in the early stages of uptake and eating regularly to prevent hypoglycaemia. We advocate techniques to improve self-control strength through rest and training on self-control tasks. Suggestions on how these techniques can be integrated into health-related behaviour-change interventions are provided. Recommendations for future research to identify the mechanisms underpinning self-control resource depletion, conduct further randomised controlled interventions using the model, and integrate strength model hypotheses into existing models of health-related behaviour are proposed. © 2009 Taylor & Francis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161360
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.976
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.685
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorWood, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorStiff, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:53Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationHealth Psychology Review, 2009, v. 3 n. 2, p. 208-238en_US
dc.identifier.issn1743-7199en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161360-
dc.description.abstractSuccessful self-regulation is associated with adherence to health-related behaviour in many domains. In contrast, self-regulatory failure is linked to poor adherence and drop-out. This review presents the strength model of self-control as a framework to explain self-regulation in health-related behaviour contexts. In the model, self-regulation is conceptualised as a limited resource that once depleted results in reduced capacity to further regulate the self. We provide an overview of the hypotheses of the strength model and review research applying the model to self-regulation in four health-related behaviour domains: dietary restraint and eating behaviour, alcohol consumption, smoking cessation and physical activity. Based on our review, we recommend practitioners adopt strategies to minimise self-regulatory failure in people engaging in health-related behaviours such as minimising demands on self-control resources in the early stages of uptake and eating regularly to prevent hypoglycaemia. We advocate techniques to improve self-control strength through rest and training on self-control tasks. Suggestions on how these techniques can be integrated into health-related behaviour-change interventions are provided. Recommendations for future research to identify the mechanisms underpinning self-control resource depletion, conduct further randomised controlled interventions using the model, and integrate strength model hypotheses into existing models of health-related behaviour are proposed. © 2009 Taylor & Francis.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17437199.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Psychology Reviewen_US
dc.subjectBehaviour Changeen_US
dc.subjectEgo-Depletionen_US
dc.subjectEnergyen_US
dc.subjectLimited Resourceen_US
dc.subjectMental Fatigueen_US
dc.subjectSelf-Controlen_US
dc.titleThe strength model of self-regulation failure and health-related behaviouren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17437190903414387en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77949515402en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77949515402&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage208en_US
dc.identifier.epage238en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000208121100002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWood, C=35724903000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStiff, C=16070708800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US

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