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Article: Self-regulation and self-control in exercise: The strength-energy model

TitleSelf-regulation and self-control in exercise: The strength-energy model
Authors
KeywordsEgo-Depletion
Limited Resource
Physical Activity
Self-Discipline
Willpower
Issue Date2010
Citation
International Review Of Sport And Exercise Psychology, 2010, v. 3 n. 1, p. 62-86 How to Cite?
AbstractSelf-regulation is an important component of psychosocial theories of exercise behaviour and lack of self-regulatory skills are associated with low adherence to health-related exercise. This review presents a strength-energy model of selfcontrol as an explanation of self-regulation in exercise contexts. The review will provide impetus for original research aimed at understanding exercise behaviour and help develop recommendations for exercise promotion. In the model, selfcontrol is conceptualized as a global but limited resource. Engaging in actions requiring self-control depletes resources leading to self-regulatory failure. Selfcontrol resource depletion is reduced through rest and frequent training on selfcontrol. The expectation of the need to exert self-control in future leads to a conservation of self-control resources. Proposed mechanisms for self-control resource depletion include changes in physiological markers and blood glucose levels. Based on our review, we propose an integrated model of self-regulation incorporating hypotheses from the strength-energy model with those from traditional psychosocial models of exercise behaviour. ecommendations for future research include incorporating hypotheses from the strength-energy model into theories of self-presentation and interpersonal relations in exercise. Practical recommendations aimed at minimising self-control depletion in exercise include the provision of advice on nutrition and recovery, self-control training, and motivational and implementation intention strategies. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161359
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.682
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.962
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorWood, CWen_US
dc.contributor.authorStiff, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:53Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Review Of Sport And Exercise Psychology, 2010, v. 3 n. 1, p. 62-86en_US
dc.identifier.issn1750-984Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161359-
dc.description.abstractSelf-regulation is an important component of psychosocial theories of exercise behaviour and lack of self-regulatory skills are associated with low adherence to health-related exercise. This review presents a strength-energy model of selfcontrol as an explanation of self-regulation in exercise contexts. The review will provide impetus for original research aimed at understanding exercise behaviour and help develop recommendations for exercise promotion. In the model, selfcontrol is conceptualized as a global but limited resource. Engaging in actions requiring self-control depletes resources leading to self-regulatory failure. Selfcontrol resource depletion is reduced through rest and frequent training on selfcontrol. The expectation of the need to exert self-control in future leads to a conservation of self-control resources. Proposed mechanisms for self-control resource depletion include changes in physiological markers and blood glucose levels. Based on our review, we propose an integrated model of self-regulation incorporating hypotheses from the strength-energy model with those from traditional psychosocial models of exercise behaviour. ecommendations for future research include incorporating hypotheses from the strength-energy model into theories of self-presentation and interpersonal relations in exercise. Practical recommendations aimed at minimising self-control depletion in exercise include the provision of advice on nutrition and recovery, self-control training, and motivational and implementation intention strategies. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Review of Sport and Exercise Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectEgo-Depletionen_US
dc.subjectLimited Resourceen_US
dc.subjectPhysical Activityen_US
dc.subjectSelf-Disciplineen_US
dc.subjectWillpoweren_US
dc.titleSelf-regulation and self-control in exercise: The strength-energy modelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17509840903322815en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77649202157en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77649202157&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage62en_US
dc.identifier.epage86en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWood, CW=35724903000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStiff, C=16070708800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US

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