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Article: Implementing intentions to drink a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution during exercise

TitleImplementing intentions to drink a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution during exercise
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02640414.asp
Citation
Journal Of Sports Sciences, 2009, v. 27 n. 9, p. 963-974 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this study, we examined the effectiveness of a theory-based psychological implementation intention strategy on the volume and frequency of intake of a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution by participants engaged in submaximal exercise. Thirty-five participants were randomly assigned to an implementation intention or control condition. Participants assigned to the implementation intention condition were required to write down when and where they would carry out their intention to drink a sports drink in the upcoming exercise trial. Participants completed self-report measures of intentions, the psychological antecedents of intentions, and past behaviour for sports drink use and physical activity before and after receiving the experimental manipulation. Participants then engaged in a one-hour submaximal exercise trial on a cycle ergometer and had free access to a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution throughout. The frequency and volume of sports drink consumed by participants over the course of the trial was recorded. Participants also provided pre- and post-trial urine samples, which were tested for osmolality. Experimental participants imbibed a significantly greater volume of sports drink and had significantly higher urine osmolality than controls. The intervention had no effects on psychological variables. Results support the use of implementation intentions to effectively promote sports drink intake among sports participants.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161353
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.142
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.204
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorMontasem, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:50Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Sports Sciences, 2009, v. 27 n. 9, p. 963-974en_US
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161353-
dc.description.abstractIn this study, we examined the effectiveness of a theory-based psychological implementation intention strategy on the volume and frequency of intake of a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution by participants engaged in submaximal exercise. Thirty-five participants were randomly assigned to an implementation intention or control condition. Participants assigned to the implementation intention condition were required to write down when and where they would carry out their intention to drink a sports drink in the upcoming exercise trial. Participants completed self-report measures of intentions, the psychological antecedents of intentions, and past behaviour for sports drink use and physical activity before and after receiving the experimental manipulation. Participants then engaged in a one-hour submaximal exercise trial on a cycle ergometer and had free access to a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution throughout. The frequency and volume of sports drink consumed by participants over the course of the trial was recorded. Participants also provided pre- and post-trial urine samples, which were tested for osmolality. Experimental participants imbibed a significantly greater volume of sports drink and had significantly higher urine osmolality than controls. The intervention had no effects on psychological variables. Results support the use of implementation intentions to effectively promote sports drink intake among sports participants.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02640414.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Sports Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBeveragesen_US
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDrinking Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshExercise - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshExercise Testen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIntentionen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshOsmolar Concentrationen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Enduranceen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleImplementing intentions to drink a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution during exerciseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02640410902998262en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19598056-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-69949176001en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-69949176001&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume27en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage963en_US
dc.identifier.epage974en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000268277900011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMontasem, A=34870346400en_US

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