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Article: Integrating the theory of planned behaviour and self-determination theory in health behaviour: A meta-analysis

TitleIntegrating the theory of planned behaviour and self-determination theory in health behaviour: A meta-analysis
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jHH_1.cfm
Citation
British Journal Of Health Psychology, 2009, v. 14 n. 2, p. 275-302 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose. A meta-analysis of studies integrating the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and self-determination theory (SDT) in health contexts is presented. The analysis aimed to provide cumulative empirical support for a motivational sequence in which self-determined motivation from SDT predicts the proximal predictors of intentions and behaviour from the TPB. Methods. A literature search identified 36 integrated studies providing 45 tests of effects between TPB and SDT variables. Hunter and Schmidt's (1994) methods of metaanalysis were used to correct the effect sizes across the studies for statistical artifacts. Age (old versus young), publication status (published versus unpublished), study design (correlational versus experimental/ intervention), and behaviour type (physical activity versus other health-related behaviours) were evaluated as moderators of the effects. A path-analysis using the meta-analytically derived correlations was conducted to examine the proposed motivational sequence. Results. Statistically significant corrected correlations were evident among the perceived autonomy support and self-determined motivation constructs from SDT and the attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, intention, and healthrelated behaviour constructs from the TPB. Only six of the 28 effect sizes were moderated by the proposed moderators. Path analysis revealed that the significant effects of self-determined motivation on intentions and behaviour were partially mediated by the proximal predictors from the TPB. Conclusions. Evidence from this synthesis supported the theoretical integration and proposed motivational sequence. Results are discussed with reference to the complementary aspects of the TPB and SDTand the need for integrated experimental or intervention studies on a broader range of health behaviours. © 2009 The British Psychological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161349
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.895
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.322
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:49Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Health Psychology, 2009, v. 14 n. 2, p. 275-302en_US
dc.identifier.issn1359-107Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161349-
dc.description.abstractPurpose. A meta-analysis of studies integrating the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and self-determination theory (SDT) in health contexts is presented. The analysis aimed to provide cumulative empirical support for a motivational sequence in which self-determined motivation from SDT predicts the proximal predictors of intentions and behaviour from the TPB. Methods. A literature search identified 36 integrated studies providing 45 tests of effects between TPB and SDT variables. Hunter and Schmidt's (1994) methods of metaanalysis were used to correct the effect sizes across the studies for statistical artifacts. Age (old versus young), publication status (published versus unpublished), study design (correlational versus experimental/ intervention), and behaviour type (physical activity versus other health-related behaviours) were evaluated as moderators of the effects. A path-analysis using the meta-analytically derived correlations was conducted to examine the proposed motivational sequence. Results. Statistically significant corrected correlations were evident among the perceived autonomy support and self-determined motivation constructs from SDT and the attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, intention, and healthrelated behaviour constructs from the TPB. Only six of the 28 effect sizes were moderated by the proposed moderators. Path analysis revealed that the significant effects of self-determined motivation on intentions and behaviour were partially mediated by the proximal predictors from the TPB. Conclusions. Evidence from this synthesis supported the theoretical integration and proposed motivational sequence. Results are discussed with reference to the complementary aspects of the TPB and SDTand the need for integrated experimental or intervention studies on a broader range of health behaviours. © 2009 The British Psychological Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jHH_1.cfmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Health Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMotivationen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonal Autonomyen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychological Theoryen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleIntegrating the theory of planned behaviour and self-determination theory in health behaviour: A meta-analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1348/135910708X373959en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18926008en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67649586694en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67649586694&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage275en_US
dc.identifier.epage302en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000265848900007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike4245630-

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