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Article: Illness Schema Activation and Attentional Bias to Coping Procedures

TitleIllness Schema Activation and Attentional Bias to Coping Procedures
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/hea.html
Citation
Health Psychology, 2009, v. 28 n. 1, p. 101-107 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Relatively little research to date has directly addressed the schematic nature of illness representations proposed by H. Leventhal, J. Weinman, and L. A. Phillips' (1980) common sense model of illness. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that coping information is schematically encoded within the representations of a specific illness. Design: A 2 (primed vs. control) × 2 (past user of coping strategy vs. nonuser of coping strategy) design was used in 2 experiments with independent samples. A subliminal prime was used to activate a common cold schema outside of conscious awareness. Main Outcome Measures: Response latencies in milliseconds for correct responses to a target common cold remedy word on a grammatical decision task served as the dependent measure in each experiment. Target words were Lemsip in Experiment 1 and lozenge in Experiment 2. Results: In each experiment, a significant interaction of Prime × Past Strategy Use was obtained. Participants in whom the "common cold" schema was activated and who also reported high past strategy use demonstrated attentional bias to the name of a popular common cold remedy. Conclusion: Activation of a schematic representation of illness may automatically activate information related to coping procedures encoded in memory with the illness. © 2009 American Psychological Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161345
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.611
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.915
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, CJen_US
dc.contributor.authorOrbell, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:47Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationHealth Psychology, 2009, v. 28 n. 1, p. 101-107en_US
dc.identifier.issn0278-6133en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161345-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Relatively little research to date has directly addressed the schematic nature of illness representations proposed by H. Leventhal, J. Weinman, and L. A. Phillips' (1980) common sense model of illness. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that coping information is schematically encoded within the representations of a specific illness. Design: A 2 (primed vs. control) × 2 (past user of coping strategy vs. nonuser of coping strategy) design was used in 2 experiments with independent samples. A subliminal prime was used to activate a common cold schema outside of conscious awareness. Main Outcome Measures: Response latencies in milliseconds for correct responses to a target common cold remedy word on a grammatical decision task served as the dependent measure in each experiment. Target words were Lemsip in Experiment 1 and lozenge in Experiment 2. Results: In each experiment, a significant interaction of Prime × Past Strategy Use was obtained. Participants in whom the "common cold" schema was activated and who also reported high past strategy use demonstrated attentional bias to the name of a popular common cold remedy. Conclusion: Activation of a schematic representation of illness may automatically activate information related to coping procedures encoded in memory with the illness. © 2009 American Psychological Association.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/hea.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAwarenessen_US
dc.subject.meshCommon Cold - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshDecision Makingen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.titleIllness Schema Activation and Attentional Bias to Coping Proceduresen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0013690en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19210023-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-58549102542en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-58549102542&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage101en_US
dc.identifier.epage107en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000262427200012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHenderson, CJ=7202490867en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOrbell, S=7005545477en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US

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