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Article: The effects of self-discordance, self-concordance, and implementation intentions on health behavior

TitleThe effects of self-discordance, self-concordance, and implementation intentions on health behavior
Authors
Issue Date2008
Citation
Journal Of Applied Biobehavioral Research, 2008, v. 13 n. 4, p. 198-214 How to Cite?
AbstractBuilding upon previous research on implementation intentions, the present study hypothesized that implementation intentions would be beneficial for participants who endorsed self-concordant and self-discordant forms of motivation. Self-concordance describes the extent to which goals are congruent with organismic needs for self-determination, competence, and relatedness whereas self-discordance describes the extent to which goals and behaviors are incongruent with these needs. Results showed that implementation intentions were beneficial for people who endorsed self-discordant forms of motivation. In addition, a statistically nonsignificant trend was observed for implementation intentions to be beneficial among individuals who endorsed self-concordant forms of motivation. It is concluded that implementation exercises are beneficial for individuals who endorse self-discordant motivation. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161344
ISSN
2005 Impact Factor: 0.091
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.188
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorThøgersenNtoumani, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:47Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Applied Biobehavioral Research, 2008, v. 13 n. 4, p. 198-214en_US
dc.identifier.issn1071-2089en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161344-
dc.description.abstractBuilding upon previous research on implementation intentions, the present study hypothesized that implementation intentions would be beneficial for participants who endorsed self-concordant and self-discordant forms of motivation. Self-concordance describes the extent to which goals are congruent with organismic needs for self-determination, competence, and relatedness whereas self-discordance describes the extent to which goals and behaviors are incongruent with these needs. Results showed that implementation intentions were beneficial for people who endorsed self-discordant forms of motivation. In addition, a statistically nonsignificant trend was observed for implementation intentions to be beneficial among individuals who endorsed self-concordant forms of motivation. It is concluded that implementation exercises are beneficial for individuals who endorse self-discordant motivation. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Applied Biobehavioral Researchen_US
dc.titleThe effects of self-discordance, self-concordance, and implementation intentions on health behavioren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1751-9861.2008.00035.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-58449096410en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-58449096410&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage198en_US
dc.identifier.epage214en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThøgersenNtoumani, C=9333116700en_US

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