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Article: Influences of personality traits and continuation intentions on physical activity participation within the theory of planned behaviour

TitleInfluences of personality traits and continuation intentions on physical activity participation within the theory of planned behaviour
Authors
KeywordsContinuation Intentions
Personality Traits
Theory Of Planned Behaviour
Issue Date2008
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08870446.asp
Citation
Psychology And Health, 2008, v. 23 n. 3, p. 347-367 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious research has suggested that the theory of planned behaviour is insufficient in capturing all the antecedents of physical activity participation and that continuation intentions or personality traits may improve the predictive validity of the model. The present study examined the combined effects of continuation intentions and personality traits on health behaviour within the theory of planned behaviour. To examine these effects, 180 university students (N = 180, Male = 87, Female = 93, Age = 19.14 years, SD = 0.94) completed self-report measures of the theory of planned behaviour, personality traits and continuation intentions. After 5 weeks, perceived achievement of behavioural outcomes and actual participation in physical activities were assessed. Results supported discriminant validity between continuation intentions, conscientiousness and extroversion and indicated that perceived achievement of behavioural outcomes and continuation intentions of failure predicted physical activity participation after controlling for personality effects, past behaviour and other variables in the theory of planned behaviour. In addition, results indicated that conscientiousness moderated the effects of continuation intentions of failure on physical activity such that continuation intentions of failure predicted physical activity participation among conscientious and not among less conscientious individuals. These findings suggest that the effects of continuation intentions on health behaviour are contingent on personality characteristics.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161340
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.983
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.960
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:46Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychology And Health, 2008, v. 23 n. 3, p. 347-367en_US
dc.identifier.issn0887-0446en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161340-
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has suggested that the theory of planned behaviour is insufficient in capturing all the antecedents of physical activity participation and that continuation intentions or personality traits may improve the predictive validity of the model. The present study examined the combined effects of continuation intentions and personality traits on health behaviour within the theory of planned behaviour. To examine these effects, 180 university students (N = 180, Male = 87, Female = 93, Age = 19.14 years, SD = 0.94) completed self-report measures of the theory of planned behaviour, personality traits and continuation intentions. After 5 weeks, perceived achievement of behavioural outcomes and actual participation in physical activities were assessed. Results supported discriminant validity between continuation intentions, conscientiousness and extroversion and indicated that perceived achievement of behavioural outcomes and continuation intentions of failure predicted physical activity participation after controlling for personality effects, past behaviour and other variables in the theory of planned behaviour. In addition, results indicated that conscientiousness moderated the effects of continuation intentions of failure on physical activity such that continuation intentions of failure predicted physical activity participation among conscientious and not among less conscientious individuals. These findings suggest that the effects of continuation intentions on health behaviour are contingent on personality characteristics.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08870446.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology and Healthen_US
dc.subjectContinuation Intentionsen_US
dc.subjectPersonality Traitsen_US
dc.subjectTheory Of Planned Behaviouren_US
dc.titleInfluences of personality traits and continuation intentions on physical activity participation within the theory of planned behaviouren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14768320601185866en_US
dc.identifier.pmid25160482-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-39749086849en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-39749086849&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume23en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage347en_US
dc.identifier.epage367en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000253508000006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike7557234-

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