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Article: Using the construct of perceived autonomy support to understand social influence within the theory of planned behavior

TitleUsing the construct of perceived autonomy support to understand social influence within the theory of planned behavior
Authors
KeywordsAutonomy Support
Past Behavior
Theory Of Planned Behavior
Issue Date2008
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsport
Citation
Psychology Of Sport And Exercise, 2008, v. 9 n. 1, p. 27-44 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: The present study examined the role of perceived autonomy support within the theory of planned behavior in a physical activity context. In accordance with self-determination theory [Ryan, R.M., & Deci, E.L. (2000). Self-determination theory and the facilitation of intrinsic motivation, social development and well being. American Psychologist, 55, 68-78], it was hypothesized that perceived autonomy support would predict intentions to participate in physical activity behavior directly and indirectly via attitudes. Design: The study followed a prospective design where variables contained in the theory of planned behavior and past behavior were assessed at baseline and physical activity was measured 5 weeks later. Method: Two hundred and thirty-five participants (male=91, female=144; M = 20.28 years, SD=6.59 years) completed self-report measures of intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, perceived autonomy support and behavior in a physical activity context. Results: Results indicated that perceived autonomy support predicted physical activity behavior indirectly via the mediation of attitudes and intentions. Past behavior did not reduce the influence that perceived autonomy support exerted on physical activity. Conclusions: It was concluded that perceived autonomy support assists in the explanation of the social influences on intentions and physical activity behavior. © 2007.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161334
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.605
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.303
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrickell, Ten_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:42Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychology Of Sport And Exercise, 2008, v. 9 n. 1, p. 27-44en_US
dc.identifier.issn1469-0292en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161334-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The present study examined the role of perceived autonomy support within the theory of planned behavior in a physical activity context. In accordance with self-determination theory [Ryan, R.M., & Deci, E.L. (2000). Self-determination theory and the facilitation of intrinsic motivation, social development and well being. American Psychologist, 55, 68-78], it was hypothesized that perceived autonomy support would predict intentions to participate in physical activity behavior directly and indirectly via attitudes. Design: The study followed a prospective design where variables contained in the theory of planned behavior and past behavior were assessed at baseline and physical activity was measured 5 weeks later. Method: Two hundred and thirty-five participants (male=91, female=144; M = 20.28 years, SD=6.59 years) completed self-report measures of intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, perceived autonomy support and behavior in a physical activity context. Results: Results indicated that perceived autonomy support predicted physical activity behavior indirectly via the mediation of attitudes and intentions. Past behavior did not reduce the influence that perceived autonomy support exerted on physical activity. Conclusions: It was concluded that perceived autonomy support assists in the explanation of the social influences on intentions and physical activity behavior. © 2007.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/psychsporten_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology of Sport and Exerciseen_US
dc.subjectAutonomy Supporten_US
dc.subjectPast Behavioren_US
dc.subjectTheory Of Planned Behavioren_US
dc.titleUsing the construct of perceived autonomy support to understand social influence within the theory of planned behavioren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychsport.2006.12.003en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35448941400en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-35448941400&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage27en_US
dc.identifier.epage44en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000251355500003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrickell, T=12141913300en_US

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