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Article: Influences of perceived autonomy support on physical activity within the theory of planned behavior

TitleInfluences of perceived autonomy support on physical activity within the theory of planned behavior
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/1823
Citation
European Journal Of Social Psychology, 2007, v. 37 n. 5, p. 934-954 How to Cite?
AbstractThree studies tested the contribution of perceived autonomy support to the prediction of health-related intentions within the theory of planned behavior. Perceived autonomy support refers to the extent to which individuals perceive that significant others encourage choice and participation in decision-making, provide a meaningful rationale, minimize pressure, and acknowledge the individual's feelings and perspectives. Findings from Studies 1 and 2 demonstrated that perceived autonomy support predicted intentions to participate in physical activity behavior directly and indirectly via attitudes. Perceived autonomy support predicted intention even after statistically controlling for the effects from past behavior, descriptive norms, and perceived social support. Study 3 found that persuasive communications influenced perceptions of autonomy support, attitudes, and intentions. Overall, the findings support the incorporation of perceived autonomy support into the theory of planned behavior. Copyright ©2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161333
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.921
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.625
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Ben_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:42Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Social Psychology, 2007, v. 37 n. 5, p. 934-954en_US
dc.identifier.issn0046-2772en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161333-
dc.description.abstractThree studies tested the contribution of perceived autonomy support to the prediction of health-related intentions within the theory of planned behavior. Perceived autonomy support refers to the extent to which individuals perceive that significant others encourage choice and participation in decision-making, provide a meaningful rationale, minimize pressure, and acknowledge the individual's feelings and perspectives. Findings from Studies 1 and 2 demonstrated that perceived autonomy support predicted intentions to participate in physical activity behavior directly and indirectly via attitudes. Perceived autonomy support predicted intention even after statistically controlling for the effects from past behavior, descriptive norms, and perceived social support. Study 3 found that persuasive communications influenced perceptions of autonomy support, attitudes, and intentions. Overall, the findings support the incorporation of perceived autonomy support into the theory of planned behavior. Copyright ©2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/1823en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Social Psychologyen_US
dc.titleInfluences of perceived autonomy support on physical activity within the theory of planned behavioren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ejsp.407en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34748908872en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34748908872&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume37en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage934en_US
dc.identifier.epage954en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000249629400011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, B=8524255100en_US

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