File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Does priming a specific illness schema result in an attentional information-processing bias for specific illnesses?

TitleDoes priming a specific illness schema result in an attentional information-processing bias for specific illnesses?
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/hea.html
Citation
Health Psychology, 2007, v. 26 n. 2, p. 165-173 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To test a hypothesis derived from H. Leventhal, D. Meyer, and D. Nerenz's (1980) commonsense model that people possess implicit schemas for specific illnesses. Design: A 2 (illness vs. neutral shopping prime) x 2 (illness-related vs. control word) mixed design with repeated measures on the second factor. Participants primed for the common cold (Experiment 1) and cardiovascular disease (Experiment 2) were compared with participants receiving a neutral shopping prime on a modified Stroop color naming task. Main Outcome Measures: Attentional bias to illness related words was calculated as the difference between response latencies to illness words and neutral words under the prime conditions. Results: In Experiment 1, participants primed with common cold showed a response bias to words related to the common cold but not to words related to cardiovascular disease. Attentional bias among participants primed for common cold was significantly correlated with explicit illness representations assessed by the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire. Experiment 2 replicated the findings in a different illness domain. Conclusion: Illness-specific illness schemas can be activated. © 2007 APA, all rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161327
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.611
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.915
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, CJen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorOrbell, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:39Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationHealth Psychology, 2007, v. 26 n. 2, p. 165-173en_US
dc.identifier.issn0278-6133en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161327-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To test a hypothesis derived from H. Leventhal, D. Meyer, and D. Nerenz's (1980) commonsense model that people possess implicit schemas for specific illnesses. Design: A 2 (illness vs. neutral shopping prime) x 2 (illness-related vs. control word) mixed design with repeated measures on the second factor. Participants primed for the common cold (Experiment 1) and cardiovascular disease (Experiment 2) were compared with participants receiving a neutral shopping prime on a modified Stroop color naming task. Main Outcome Measures: Attentional bias to illness related words was calculated as the difference between response latencies to illness words and neutral words under the prime conditions. Results: In Experiment 1, participants primed with common cold showed a response bias to words related to the common cold but not to words related to cardiovascular disease. Attentional bias among participants primed for common cold was significantly correlated with explicit illness representations assessed by the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire. Experiment 2 replicated the findings in a different illness domain. Conclusion: Illness-specific illness schemas can be activated. © 2007 APA, all rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/hea.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAttentionen_US
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseasesen_US
dc.subject.meshCommon Colden_US
dc.subject.meshCommunicationen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGreat Britainen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Processesen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.titleDoes priming a specific illness schema result in an attentional information-processing bias for specific illnesses?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/0278-6133.26.2.165en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17385968-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33947662038en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33947662038&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume26en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage165en_US
dc.identifier.epage173en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245137300006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHenderson, CJ=7202490867en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOrbell, S=7005545477en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats