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Article: Self-identity and the theory of planned behaviour: Between- And within-participants analyses

TitleSelf-identity and the theory of planned behaviour: Between- And within-participants analyses
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jSP_1.cfm
Citation
British Journal Of Social Psychology, 2006, v. 45 n. 4, p. 731-757 How to Cite?
AbstractTwo studies addressed the hypothesis that a minority of people are more oriented towards their self-identity when forming intentions to act than the traditional antecedents of intentional action; attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control (PBC). In Study I, participants (N = 241) completed measures of an augmented version of theory of planned behaviour (TPB) that included self-identity for 30 behaviours. Using within-participants multiple regression analyses, the sample was classified into self-identity-oriented (SI-oriented) and TPB-oriented groups. Between-participants multiple regression analyses revealed that self-identity was a significantly stronger predictor of intentions and accounted for significantly more incremental variance in intentions in the SI-oriented sample compared with the TPB-oriented sample across the 30 behaviours. In Study 2, participants (N = 250) completed the same TPB and self-identity measures used in Study I as well as measures of generalized self-concept and social physique anxiety for dieting behaviour. Results indicated that self-identity was significantly associated with the generalized self-related measures, and self-concept and social physique anxiety moderated the self-identity-intention relationship. This investigation provides some preliminary evidence to support the effect of individual differences in self-identity on the formation of intentions to act. © 2006 The British Psychological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161324
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.798
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.352
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:38Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Social Psychology, 2006, v. 45 n. 4, p. 731-757en_US
dc.identifier.issn0144-6665en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161324-
dc.description.abstractTwo studies addressed the hypothesis that a minority of people are more oriented towards their self-identity when forming intentions to act than the traditional antecedents of intentional action; attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control (PBC). In Study I, participants (N = 241) completed measures of an augmented version of theory of planned behaviour (TPB) that included self-identity for 30 behaviours. Using within-participants multiple regression analyses, the sample was classified into self-identity-oriented (SI-oriented) and TPB-oriented groups. Between-participants multiple regression analyses revealed that self-identity was a significantly stronger predictor of intentions and accounted for significantly more incremental variance in intentions in the SI-oriented sample compared with the TPB-oriented sample across the 30 behaviours. In Study 2, participants (N = 250) completed the same TPB and self-identity measures used in Study I as well as measures of generalized self-concept and social physique anxiety for dieting behaviour. Results indicated that self-identity was significantly associated with the generalized self-related measures, and self-concept and social physique anxiety moderated the self-identity-intention relationship. This investigation provides some preliminary evidence to support the effect of individual differences in self-identity on the formation of intentions to act. © 2006 The British Psychological Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jSP_1.cfmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Social Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAnxiety - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAttitudeen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIntentionen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychological Theoryen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychology - Methods - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Behavioren_US
dc.titleSelf-identity and the theory of planned behaviour: Between- And within-participants analysesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1348/014466605X85654en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17393878-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846533688en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33846533688&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume45en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage731en_US
dc.identifier.epage757en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243430700005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike965506-

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