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Article: The process by which relative autonomous motivation affects intentional behavior: Comparing effects across dieting and exercise behaviors

TitleThe process by which relative autonomous motivation affects intentional behavior: Comparing effects across dieting and exercise behaviors
Authors
KeywordsEnergy Balance
Planned Behavior
Self-Determination Theory
Theoretical Integration
Issue Date2006
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0146-7239
Citation
Motivation And Emotion, 2006, v. 30 n. 4, p. 307-321 How to Cite?
AbstractA motivational model integrating self-deter-mination theory and the theory of planned behavior was tested in two samples for exercise and dieting behavior respectively. Relative autonomous motivation from self-determination theory was hypothesized to predict intentions to exercise or diet via the mediation of attitudes and perceived behavioral control (PBC) from the theory of planned behavior. It was also expected that attitudes and PBC would predict actual levels of exercise and dieting behavior via the mediation of intentions. Relations in the proposed model were expected to be invariant across the behaviors. Two samples of participants (N = 511) completed measures of the autonomous motives, attitudes, subjective norms, PBC, and intentions with respect to exercise and dieting behavior. Four weeks later, participants self-reported their behavior. Structural equation models supported the replicability of the proposed model in both behaviors. Findings supported the majority of the hypothesized effects in the proposed model across the two health behaviors. However, four effects were significantly different across the two behaviors: the effect of autonomous motives on intentions, subjective norms and PBC on intentions, and intentions on behavior. Findings extend knowledge of the processes by which psychological antecedents from the theories affect health behaviors integral to the maintenance of energy balance. © 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161323
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.612
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.186
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:38Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationMotivation And Emotion, 2006, v. 30 n. 4, p. 307-321en_US
dc.identifier.issn0146-7239en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161323-
dc.description.abstractA motivational model integrating self-deter-mination theory and the theory of planned behavior was tested in two samples for exercise and dieting behavior respectively. Relative autonomous motivation from self-determination theory was hypothesized to predict intentions to exercise or diet via the mediation of attitudes and perceived behavioral control (PBC) from the theory of planned behavior. It was also expected that attitudes and PBC would predict actual levels of exercise and dieting behavior via the mediation of intentions. Relations in the proposed model were expected to be invariant across the behaviors. Two samples of participants (N = 511) completed measures of the autonomous motives, attitudes, subjective norms, PBC, and intentions with respect to exercise and dieting behavior. Four weeks later, participants self-reported their behavior. Structural equation models supported the replicability of the proposed model in both behaviors. Findings supported the majority of the hypothesized effects in the proposed model across the two health behaviors. However, four effects were significantly different across the two behaviors: the effect of autonomous motives on intentions, subjective norms and PBC on intentions, and intentions on behavior. Findings extend knowledge of the processes by which psychological antecedents from the theories affect health behaviors integral to the maintenance of energy balance. © 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0146-7239en_US
dc.relation.ispartofMotivation and Emotionen_US
dc.subjectEnergy Balanceen_US
dc.subjectPlanned Behavioren_US
dc.subjectSelf-Determination Theoryen_US
dc.subjectTheoretical Integrationen_US
dc.titleThe process by which relative autonomous motivation affects intentional behavior: Comparing effects across dieting and exercise behaviorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11031-006-9046-5en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33845614005en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33845614005&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage307en_US
dc.identifier.epage321en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000242830600006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHarris, J=7407317429en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike1040919-

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