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Article: Temporal framing and the decision to take part in type 2 diabetes screening: Effects of individual differences in consideration of future consequences on persuasion

TitleTemporal framing and the decision to take part in type 2 diabetes screening: Effects of individual differences in consideration of future consequences on persuasion
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/hea.html
Citation
Health Psychology, 2006, v. 25 n. 4, p. 537-548 How to Cite?
AbstractReliable individual differences in the extent to which people consider the long- and short-term consequences of their own behaviors are hypothesized to influence the impact of a persuasive communication. In a field experiment, the time frame of occurrence of positive and negative consequences of taking part in a proposed Type 2 diabetes screening program was manipulated in a sample of 210 adults with a mean age of 53 years. Individual differences in consideration of future consequences (CFC; A. Strathman, F. Gleicher, D. S. Boninger, & C. S. Edwards, 1994) moderated (a) the generation of positive and negative thoughts and (b) the persuasive impact of the different communications. Low-CFC individuals were more persuaded when positive consequences were short term and negative consequences were long term. The opposite was true of high-CFC individuals. Path analyses show that net positive thoughts generated mediated the effect of the CFC x Time Frame manipulations on behavioral intentions. Copyright 2006 by the American Psychological Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161317
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.611
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.915
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOrbell, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagger, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:35Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationHealth Psychology, 2006, v. 25 n. 4, p. 537-548en_US
dc.identifier.issn0278-6133en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161317-
dc.description.abstractReliable individual differences in the extent to which people consider the long- and short-term consequences of their own behaviors are hypothesized to influence the impact of a persuasive communication. In a field experiment, the time frame of occurrence of positive and negative consequences of taking part in a proposed Type 2 diabetes screening program was manipulated in a sample of 210 adults with a mean age of 53 years. Individual differences in consideration of future consequences (CFC; A. Strathman, F. Gleicher, D. S. Boninger, & C. S. Edwards, 1994) moderated (a) the generation of positive and negative thoughts and (b) the persuasive impact of the different communications. Low-CFC individuals were more persuaded when positive consequences were short term and negative consequences were long term. The opposite was true of high-CFC individuals. Path analyses show that net positive thoughts generated mediated the effect of the CFC x Time Frame manipulations on behavioral intentions. Copyright 2006 by the American Psychological Association.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/hea.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude To Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshDecision Makingen_US
dc.subject.meshDemographyen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMass Screening - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshMotivationen_US
dc.subject.meshPersuasive Communicationen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleTemporal framing and the decision to take part in type 2 diabetes screening: Effects of individual differences in consideration of future consequences on persuasionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, M:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, M=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/0278-6133.25.4.537en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16846330-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33746778776en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33746778776&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage537en_US
dc.identifier.epage548en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000239179500012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOrbell, S=7005545477en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, M=6602134841en_US

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