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Article: Injury representations, coping, emotions, and functional outcomes in athletes with sports-related injuries: A test of self-regulation theory

TitleInjury representations, coping, emotions, and functional outcomes in athletes with sports-related injuries: A test of self-regulation theory
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0021-9029
Citation
Journal Of Applied Social Psychology, 2005, v. 35 n. 11, p. 2345-2374 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examined the influence of injury representations on emotions and outcomes of athletes with sports-related musculoskeletal injuries using self-regulation theory. Participants were athletes (N = 220; M age = 23.44 years, SD = 8.42) with a current sports-related musculoskeletal injury. Participants self-reported their cognitive and emotional injury representations, emotions coping procedures, physical and sports functioning, attendance at treatment centers, and 3-week follow-up attendance. Participants' negative and positive affect were influenced by emotional representations. Identity, causal attributions, and emotional representations influenced physical functioning; and identity, serious consequences, causal attributions, and emotional representations predicted sports functioning. Injury severity, identity, and personal control predicted attendance at treatment centers, but the effect of personal control was mediated by problem-focused coping. Problem-focused coping predicted 3-week follow-up attendance. Results support self-regulation theory for examining injury representations in athletes. Copyright © 2005 by V. H. Winston & Son, Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161314
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.006
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.639
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.contributor.authorThatcher, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:34Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Applied Social Psychology, 2005, v. 35 n. 11, p. 2345-2374en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-9029en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161314-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the influence of injury representations on emotions and outcomes of athletes with sports-related musculoskeletal injuries using self-regulation theory. Participants were athletes (N = 220; M age = 23.44 years, SD = 8.42) with a current sports-related musculoskeletal injury. Participants self-reported their cognitive and emotional injury representations, emotions coping procedures, physical and sports functioning, attendance at treatment centers, and 3-week follow-up attendance. Participants' negative and positive affect were influenced by emotional representations. Identity, causal attributions, and emotional representations influenced physical functioning; and identity, serious consequences, causal attributions, and emotional representations predicted sports functioning. Injury severity, identity, and personal control predicted attendance at treatment centers, but the effect of personal control was mediated by problem-focused coping. Problem-focused coping predicted 3-week follow-up attendance. Results support self-regulation theory for examining injury representations in athletes. Copyright © 2005 by V. H. Winston & Son, Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0021-9029en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Applied Social Psychologyen_US
dc.titleInjury representations, coping, emotions, and functional outcomes in athletes with sports-related injuries: A test of self-regulation theoryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1559-1816.2005.tb02106.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-32944464686en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-32944464686&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume35en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage2345en_US
dc.identifier.epage2374en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000234756600006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGriffin, M=23496428300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThatcher, J=23037000200en_US

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