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Article: Effects of a brief intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behavior on leisure-time physical activity participation

TitleEffects of a brief intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behavior on leisure-time physical activity participation
Authors
KeywordsAttitudes
Beliefs
Mediation
Persuasive Communication
Issue Date2005
Citation
Journal Of Sport And Exercise Psychology, 2005, v. 27 n. 4, p. 470-487 How to Cite?
AbstractTwo persuasive communications were developed to assess the utility of an intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behavior in promoting physical activity attitudes, intentions, and behavior. One persuasive communication targeted modal salient behavioral beliefs (salient belief condition) while the other persuasive communication targeted nonsalient behavioral beliefs (nonsalient belief condition). Results of an intervention study conducted on young people (N = 83, mean age 14.60 yrs, SD = .47) indicated that participants who were presented with the persuasive message targeting modal salient behavioral beliefs reported more positive attitudes (p < .05) and stronger intentions (p = .059) than those presented with the message targeting nonsalient behavioral beliefs. However, neither communication influenced physical activity participation (p > .05). Path analysis also indicated that the effects of the persuasive communication on intentions were mediated by attitudes and not by perceived behavioral control or subjective norms. © 2005 Human Kinetics, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161311
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.379
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.237
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:33Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Sport And Exercise Psychology, 2005, v. 27 n. 4, p. 470-487en_US
dc.identifier.issn0895-2779en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161311-
dc.description.abstractTwo persuasive communications were developed to assess the utility of an intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behavior in promoting physical activity attitudes, intentions, and behavior. One persuasive communication targeted modal salient behavioral beliefs (salient belief condition) while the other persuasive communication targeted nonsalient behavioral beliefs (nonsalient belief condition). Results of an intervention study conducted on young people (N = 83, mean age 14.60 yrs, SD = .47) indicated that participants who were presented with the persuasive message targeting modal salient behavioral beliefs reported more positive attitudes (p < .05) and stronger intentions (p = .059) than those presented with the message targeting nonsalient behavioral beliefs. However, neither communication influenced physical activity participation (p > .05). Path analysis also indicated that the effects of the persuasive communication on intentions were mediated by attitudes and not by perceived behavioral control or subjective norms. © 2005 Human Kinetics, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychologyen_US
dc.subjectAttitudesen_US
dc.subjectBeliefsen_US
dc.subjectMediationen_US
dc.subjectPersuasive Communicationen_US
dc.titleEffects of a brief intervention based on the Theory of Planned Behavior on leisure-time physical activity participationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-28444443741en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-28444443741&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume27en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage470en_US
dc.identifier.epage487en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US

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