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Article: The influences of continuation intentions on execution of social behaviour within the theory of planned behaviour

TitleThe influences of continuation intentions on execution of social behaviour within the theory of planned behaviour
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jSP_1.cfm
Citation
British Journal Of Social Psychology, 2004, v. 43 n. 4, p. 551-583 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study explores the predictive accuracy of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in relation to continuation of intentions. Three studies examined the hypothesis that continuation intentions of success and continuation intentions of failure would improve utility of the TPB in predicting and promoting social behaviour. As a new construct, continuation intentions of success and continuation intentions of failure aim to describe people's readiness to continue performance of an activity under conditions that signify successful and unsuccessful progress at behavioural outcomes. As predicted, Study 1 (N = 222, male = 107, female = 115, age = 14.62 yrs, SD = 1.45) and Study 2 (N = 200, male =101, female = 98, age = 14.29 yrs, SD = .92) showed that continuation intentions of success and continuation intentions of failure contributed to the prediction of physical activity over and above components of the TPB, past behaviour and perceived progress. Study 3 (N = 93, male = 50, female = 42, age = 20.53 yrs, SD = 3.36), a study of food choice, manipulated continuation intentions and showed that participants who formed continuation intentions were more likely to eat five portions of fruit and/or vegetables than participants in a control group. Together, these findings underscore the theoretical as well as practical importance of distinguishing between intentions and continuation intentions, and the need for influence attempts to manipulate continuation intentions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161304
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.798
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.352
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorPhoenix, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:31Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:31Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Social Psychology, 2004, v. 43 n. 4, p. 551-583en_US
dc.identifier.issn0144-6665en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161304-
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the predictive accuracy of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) in relation to continuation of intentions. Three studies examined the hypothesis that continuation intentions of success and continuation intentions of failure would improve utility of the TPB in predicting and promoting social behaviour. As a new construct, continuation intentions of success and continuation intentions of failure aim to describe people's readiness to continue performance of an activity under conditions that signify successful and unsuccessful progress at behavioural outcomes. As predicted, Study 1 (N = 222, male = 107, female = 115, age = 14.62 yrs, SD = 1.45) and Study 2 (N = 200, male =101, female = 98, age = 14.29 yrs, SD = .92) showed that continuation intentions of success and continuation intentions of failure contributed to the prediction of physical activity over and above components of the TPB, past behaviour and perceived progress. Study 3 (N = 93, male = 50, female = 42, age = 20.53 yrs, SD = 3.36), a study of food choice, manipulated continuation intentions and showed that participants who formed continuation intentions were more likely to eat five portions of fruit and/or vegetables than participants in a control group. Together, these findings underscore the theoretical as well as practical importance of distinguishing between intentions and continuation intentions, and the need for influence attempts to manipulate continuation intentions.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jSP_1.cfmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Social Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBehavior Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshExercise - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFood Preferences - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Promotionen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIntentionen_US
dc.subject.meshLeisure Activitiesen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMotivationen_US
dc.subject.meshOutcome Assessment (Health Care) - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Inventory - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychometricsen_US
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Behavioren_US
dc.titleThe influences of continuation intentions on execution of social behaviour within the theory of planned behaviouren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1348/0144666042565399en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15601509-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-10844240628en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-10844240628&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume43en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage551en_US
dc.identifier.epage583en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000225784900006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, B=8524255100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPhoenix, C=7003324693en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike61506-

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