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Article: A meta-analytic review of the common-sense model of illness representations

TitleA meta-analytic review of the common-sense model of illness representations
Authors
KeywordsClassification Of Coping
Illness Cognitions
Research Synthesis
Self-Regulation Model
Issue Date2003
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08870446.asp
Citation
Psychology And Health, 2003, v. 18 n. 2, p. 141-184 How to Cite?
AbstractA meta-analysis of empirical studies (N = 45) adopting Leventhal, Meyer and Nerenz's (1980) Common Sense Model (CSM) of illness representations is presented. The average corrected intercorrelation matrix for the sample of studies showed that the CSM illness cognition dimensions of consequences, control/cure, identity and timeline followed a logical pattern supporting their construct and discriminant validity across illness types. A content analysis classified coping strategies into seven distinctive categories and health outcomes into six categories. Examining the average corrected correlation coefficients across the studies revealed that perceptions of a strong illness identity were significantly and positively related to the use of coping strategies of avoidance and emotion expression. In addition, perceived controllability of the illness was significantly associated with cognitive reappraisal, expressing emotions and problem-focused coping strategies. Perceptions of the illness as highly symptomatic, having a chronic timeline and serious consequences was significantly correlated with avoidance and expressing emotions coping strategies. Further, perceptions that the illness was curable/controllable was significantly and positively related to the adaptive outcomes of psychological well-being, social functioning and vitality and negatively related to psychological distress and disease state. Conversely, illness consequences, timeline and identity exhibited significant, negative relationships with psychological well being, role and social functioning and vitality. The analyses provide evidence for theoretically predictable relations between illness cognitions, coping and outcomes across studies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161299
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.983
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.960
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorOrbell, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:23Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychology And Health, 2003, v. 18 n. 2, p. 141-184en_US
dc.identifier.issn0887-0446en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161299-
dc.description.abstractA meta-analysis of empirical studies (N = 45) adopting Leventhal, Meyer and Nerenz's (1980) Common Sense Model (CSM) of illness representations is presented. The average corrected intercorrelation matrix for the sample of studies showed that the CSM illness cognition dimensions of consequences, control/cure, identity and timeline followed a logical pattern supporting their construct and discriminant validity across illness types. A content analysis classified coping strategies into seven distinctive categories and health outcomes into six categories. Examining the average corrected correlation coefficients across the studies revealed that perceptions of a strong illness identity were significantly and positively related to the use of coping strategies of avoidance and emotion expression. In addition, perceived controllability of the illness was significantly associated with cognitive reappraisal, expressing emotions and problem-focused coping strategies. Perceptions of the illness as highly symptomatic, having a chronic timeline and serious consequences was significantly correlated with avoidance and expressing emotions coping strategies. Further, perceptions that the illness was curable/controllable was significantly and positively related to the adaptive outcomes of psychological well-being, social functioning and vitality and negatively related to psychological distress and disease state. Conversely, illness consequences, timeline and identity exhibited significant, negative relationships with psychological well being, role and social functioning and vitality. The analyses provide evidence for theoretically predictable relations between illness cognitions, coping and outcomes across studies.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08870446.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology and Healthen_US
dc.subjectClassification Of Copingen_US
dc.subjectIllness Cognitionsen_US
dc.subjectResearch Synthesisen_US
dc.subjectSelf-Regulation Modelen_US
dc.titleA meta-analytic review of the common-sense model of illness representationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/088704403100081321en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037382203en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037382203&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage141en_US
dc.identifier.epage184en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000181925800001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOrbell, S=7005545477en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike3995658-

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