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Article: The influence of autonomous and controlling motives on physical activity intentions within the Theory of Planned Behaviour

TitleThe influence of autonomous and controlling motives on physical activity intentions within the Theory of Planned Behaviour
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jHH_1.cfm
Citation
British Journal Of Health Psychology, 2002, v. 7 n. 3, p. 283-297 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives. This study aimed to examine how general motives from self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 1985) influence intentions to engage in physical activity within the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB; Ajzen, 1985). It was hypothesized that the general motives will influence intentions only when mediated by the specific cognitions of attitude, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control (PBC) from the TPB. Design. A cross-sectional study assessing psychological variables from two theoretical perspectives. Method. Self-report questionnaires were administered to 1088 children aged 12-14 years. The children's intentions, attitudes, subjective norms and PBC towards participating in physical activity were assessed using a TPB questionnaire. A modified verson of Ryan and Connell's (1989) perceived locus of causality (PLOC) inventory was used to measure controlling and autonomous motives for participating in physical activity. Results. These data were analysed using structural equation modelling. The resulting well-flying model demonstrated that attitude and PBC mediated the influence of autonomous motives to perform physical activity on physical activity intentions. The presence of autonomous motives resulted in the effects of the controlling motives being attenuated to zero. Conclusions. The present results indicate that general autonomous motives to participate in physical activity act as sources of information when childen make their judgments regarding their specific attitudes and PBC. Attitudes and PBC are necessary to translate these general motives from SDT into intentions in the TPB. In terms of targets for intervention, practitioners may positively influence intentions by providing a choice of physical activities to foster increased autonomy in children.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161297
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.895
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.322
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, NLDen_US
dc.contributor.authorBiddle, SJHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:22Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Health Psychology, 2002, v. 7 n. 3, p. 283-297en_US
dc.identifier.issn1359-107Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161297-
dc.description.abstractObjectives. This study aimed to examine how general motives from self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 1985) influence intentions to engage in physical activity within the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB; Ajzen, 1985). It was hypothesized that the general motives will influence intentions only when mediated by the specific cognitions of attitude, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control (PBC) from the TPB. Design. A cross-sectional study assessing psychological variables from two theoretical perspectives. Method. Self-report questionnaires were administered to 1088 children aged 12-14 years. The children's intentions, attitudes, subjective norms and PBC towards participating in physical activity were assessed using a TPB questionnaire. A modified verson of Ryan and Connell's (1989) perceived locus of causality (PLOC) inventory was used to measure controlling and autonomous motives for participating in physical activity. Results. These data were analysed using structural equation modelling. The resulting well-flying model demonstrated that attitude and PBC mediated the influence of autonomous motives to perform physical activity on physical activity intentions. The presence of autonomous motives resulted in the effects of the controlling motives being attenuated to zero. Conclusions. The present results indicate that general autonomous motives to participate in physical activity act as sources of information when childen make their judgments regarding their specific attitudes and PBC. Attitudes and PBC are necessary to translate these general motives from SDT into intentions in the TPB. In terms of targets for intervention, practitioners may positively influence intentions by providing a choice of physical activities to foster increased autonomy in children.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe British Psychological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bps.org.uk/publications/jHH_1.cfmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Health Psychologyen_US
dc.titleThe influence of autonomous and controlling motives on physical activity intentions within the Theory of Planned Behaviouren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1348/135910702760213689en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036725553en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036725553&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume7en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage283en_US
dc.identifier.epage297en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000177837300003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, NLD=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBiddle, SJH=7004885406en_US

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