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Article: The influence of self-efficacy and past behaviour on the physical activity intentions of young people

TitleThe influence of self-efficacy and past behaviour on the physical activity intentions of young people
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02640414.asp
Citation
Journal Of Sports Sciences, 2001, v. 19 n. 9, p. 711-725 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of the present study was to assess the influence of self-efficacy and past behaviour on young people's physical activity intentions using an augmented version of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behaviour. We hypothesized that self-efficacy would exhibit discriminant validity with perceived behavioural control and explain unique variance in young people's intentions to participate in physical activity. We also expected that past physical activity behaviour would attenuate the influence of attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and self-efficacy on intention. The sample comprised 1152 young people aged 13.5 ± 0.6 years (mean ± s) who completed inventories assessing their physical activity intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, self-efficacy and past physical activity behaviour. A confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated that the constructs of the Theory of Planned Behaviour achieved discriminant validity. Furthermore, the measures of attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and self-efficacy were significantly related to their respective belief-based measures, supporting the concurrent validity of the measures of the Theory of Planned Behaviour. A non-standard structural equation model demonstrated that attitude and self-efficacy were strong predictors of physical activity intention, but perceived behavioural control and subjective norms were not. Self-efficacy attenuated the influence of attitudes and perceived behavioural control on intention. Past behaviour predicted intention directly and indirectly through self-efficacy and attitude. The present findings demonstrate that young people with positive attitudes and high self-efficacy are more likely to form intentions to participate in physical activity. Furthermore, controlling for past physical activity behaviour revealed that the unique effects of self-efficacy and attitudes on young people's physical activity intentions were unaltered.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161296
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.142
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.204
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHagger, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChatzisarantis, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorBiddle, SJHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:30:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:30:22Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Sports Sciences, 2001, v. 19 n. 9, p. 711-725en_US
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161296-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the present study was to assess the influence of self-efficacy and past behaviour on young people's physical activity intentions using an augmented version of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behaviour. We hypothesized that self-efficacy would exhibit discriminant validity with perceived behavioural control and explain unique variance in young people's intentions to participate in physical activity. We also expected that past physical activity behaviour would attenuate the influence of attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and self-efficacy on intention. The sample comprised 1152 young people aged 13.5 ± 0.6 years (mean ± s) who completed inventories assessing their physical activity intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, self-efficacy and past physical activity behaviour. A confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated that the constructs of the Theory of Planned Behaviour achieved discriminant validity. Furthermore, the measures of attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and self-efficacy were significantly related to their respective belief-based measures, supporting the concurrent validity of the measures of the Theory of Planned Behaviour. A non-standard structural equation model demonstrated that attitude and self-efficacy were strong predictors of physical activity intention, but perceived behavioural control and subjective norms were not. Self-efficacy attenuated the influence of attitudes and perceived behavioural control on intention. Past behaviour predicted intention directly and indirectly through self-efficacy and attitude. The present findings demonstrate that young people with positive attitudes and high self-efficacy are more likely to form intentions to participate in physical activity. Furthermore, controlling for past physical activity behaviour revealed that the unique effects of self-efficacy and attitudes on young people's physical activity intentions were unaltered.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02640414.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Sports Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescent Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude To Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshExercise - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshMotivationen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshReproducibility Of Resultsen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Efficacyen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Valuesen_US
dc.subject.meshStatistics As Topicen_US
dc.titleThe influence of self-efficacy and past behaviour on the physical activity intentions of young peopleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHagger, MS:martin.hagger@nottingham.ac.uken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHagger, MS=rp01644en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02640410152475847en_US
dc.identifier.pmid11522147-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034864924en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034864924&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage711en_US
dc.identifier.epage725en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000170438700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHagger, MS=6602134841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatzisarantis, N=6602156578en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBiddle, SJH=7004885406en_US

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