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Article: Unlocking the potential of creative commons for Hong Kong's education and creative sectors

TitleUnlocking the potential of creative commons for Hong Kong's education and creative sectors
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherSweet & Maxwell Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hku.hk/law/hklj/
Citation
Hong Kong Law Journal, 2010, v. 40 PART 2, p. 381-415 How to Cite?
AbstractCreative Commons is a non-profit organisation founded by Professor Lawrence Lessig in the United States. The organisation seeks to replace the default rule of "All Rights Reserved" under copyright law with a fl exible "Some Rights Reserved" approach in order to promote the wider dissemination of knowledge and innovation in society. It achieves its aims by offering user-friendly copyright licences which authors and creators can attach to their works so as to encourage free use and remix by others within the prescribed limits. Creative Commons licences have been adapted to Hong Kong copyright law since 2008. This article contends that the current copyright system fails to promote the education and creativity of the young generation and examines how Creative Commons could assume a pivotal role in advancing the education and creative sectors in Hong Kong. Case studies are drawn from the local community and overseas where appropriate.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161261
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.215
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101
SSRN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, KHFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T08:28:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T08:28:38Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Law Journal, 2010, v. 40 PART 2, p. 381-415en_US
dc.identifier.issn0378-0600en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161261-
dc.description.abstractCreative Commons is a non-profit organisation founded by Professor Lawrence Lessig in the United States. The organisation seeks to replace the default rule of "All Rights Reserved" under copyright law with a fl exible "Some Rights Reserved" approach in order to promote the wider dissemination of knowledge and innovation in society. It achieves its aims by offering user-friendly copyright licences which authors and creators can attach to their works so as to encourage free use and remix by others within the prescribed limits. Creative Commons licences have been adapted to Hong Kong copyright law since 2008. This article contends that the current copyright system fails to promote the education and creativity of the young generation and examines how Creative Commons could assume a pivotal role in advancing the education and creative sectors in Hong Kong. Case studies are drawn from the local community and overseas where appropriate.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSweet & Maxwell Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hku.hk/law/hklj/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Law Journalen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleUnlocking the potential of creative commons for Hong Kong's education and creative sectorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKwok, KHF:khfkwok@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKwok, KHF=rp01637en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79955064226en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros217702-
dc.identifier.hkuros238567-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79955064226&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume40en_US
dc.identifier.issuePART 2en_US
dc.identifier.spage381en_US
dc.identifier.epage415en_US
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_US
dc.identifier.ssrn1727011-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, KHF=37100116800en_US

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