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Conference Paper: A right visual field advantage without left hemisphere lateralization in music notation reading
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TitleA right visual field advantage without left hemisphere lateralization in music notation reading
 
AuthorsHsiao, JHW
Wong, KL
 
KeywordsMedical sciences
Ophthalmology and optometry
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
 
CitationThe 12th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2012), Naples, FL., 11-16 May 2012. In Journal of Vision, 2012, v. 12 n. 9, p. 534 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1167/12.9.534
 
AbstractThe divided visual field (VF) paradigm has been commonly used to examine hemispheric lateralization in the recognition of visual stimuli, i.e., a right visual field (RVF) advantage indicates left hemisphere (LH) lateralization. For example, in English word recognition, an RVF advantage has been observed in tachistoscopic recognition tasks, consistent with the fMRI finding that a region in the LH selectively responds to words in contrast to random letter strings. Recent research suggests that in addition to hemispheric lateralization, the RVF advantage may also be due to information structure of the words and reading direction (Brysbaert & Nazir, 2005). However, it is difficult to tease apart the contribution of the three factors in English word recognition. Here, we tested whether reading direction alone is sufficient to account for the RVF advantage with music reading. While music reading shares the left-to-right reading direction with English reading, music sequences are highly varied and presumably do not have an asymmetric information structure as English words. Also, experts learn to recruit both hemispheres for music reading (Wong & Gauthier, 2010), in contrast to the LH lateralization of word recognition. Music-reading experts and novices judged whether two sequentially presented three-note sequences were identical with key press. The first sequence was presented in the far-right, near-right, center, near-left or far-left part of the VF, while the central fixation of participants was monitored by eye-tracking. Experts but not novices showed a performance advantage when the sequence was presented in the RVF compared with the left VF locations. Also, faster music readers (measured by a separate perceptual fluency test) predicted a larger RVF advantage, suggesting that music-reading training results in the RVF advantage. Our results suggest that an RVF advantage does not always imply LH lateralization; reading direction alone is sufficient to account for the RVF advantage in reading.
 
DescriptionOpen Access Journal
This journal issue contains meeting abstracts presented at VSS 2012
 
ISSN1534-7362
2013 Impact Factor: 2.727
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.297
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1167/12.9.534
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, JHW
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, KL
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-23T06:21:19Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-23T06:21:19Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractThe divided visual field (VF) paradigm has been commonly used to examine hemispheric lateralization in the recognition of visual stimuli, i.e., a right visual field (RVF) advantage indicates left hemisphere (LH) lateralization. For example, in English word recognition, an RVF advantage has been observed in tachistoscopic recognition tasks, consistent with the fMRI finding that a region in the LH selectively responds to words in contrast to random letter strings. Recent research suggests that in addition to hemispheric lateralization, the RVF advantage may also be due to information structure of the words and reading direction (Brysbaert & Nazir, 2005). However, it is difficult to tease apart the contribution of the three factors in English word recognition. Here, we tested whether reading direction alone is sufficient to account for the RVF advantage with music reading. While music reading shares the left-to-right reading direction with English reading, music sequences are highly varied and presumably do not have an asymmetric information structure as English words. Also, experts learn to recruit both hemispheres for music reading (Wong & Gauthier, 2010), in contrast to the LH lateralization of word recognition. Music-reading experts and novices judged whether two sequentially presented three-note sequences were identical with key press. The first sequence was presented in the far-right, near-right, center, near-left or far-left part of the VF, while the central fixation of participants was monitored by eye-tracking. Experts but not novices showed a performance advantage when the sequence was presented in the RVF compared with the left VF locations. Also, faster music readers (measured by a separate perceptual fluency test) predicted a larger RVF advantage, suggesting that music-reading training results in the RVF advantage. Our results suggest that an RVF advantage does not always imply LH lateralization; reading direction alone is sufficient to account for the RVF advantage in reading.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal
 
dc.descriptionThis journal issue contains meeting abstracts presented at VSS 2012
 
dc.description.otherThe 12th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2012), Naples, FL., 11-16 May 2012. In Journal of Vision, 2012, v. 12 n. 9, p. 534
 
dc.identifier.citationThe 12th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2012), Naples, FL., 11-16 May 2012. In Journal of Vision, 2012, v. 12 n. 9, p. 534 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1167/12.9.534
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1167/12.9.534
 
dc.identifier.epage534
 
dc.identifier.hkuros206420
 
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362
2013 Impact Factor: 2.727
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.297
 
dc.identifier.issue9
 
dc.identifier.spage534
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161260
 
dc.identifier.volume12
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Vision
 
dc.subjectMedical sciences
 
dc.subjectOphthalmology and optometry
 
dc.titleA right visual field advantage without left hemisphere lateralization in music notation reading
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
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