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Article: Transmission of pandemic influenza H1N1 (2009) in Vietnamese swine in 2009-2010

TitleTransmission of pandemic influenza H1N1 (2009) in Vietnamese swine in 2009-2010
Authors
KeywordsCross-species transmission
Epidemiology
Influenza pandemic H1N1
Swine
Vietnam
Issue Date2012
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=1750-2640&site=1
Citation
Influenza And Other Respiratory Viruses, 2012, v. 6 n. 5, p. 348-357 How to Cite?
AbstractThe pandemic of 2009 was caused by an H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus of swine origin. This pandemic virus has repeatedly infected swine through reverse zoonosis, although the extent of such infection in swine remains unclear. Objective This study targets small and commercial pig producers in North Vietnam, in order to estimate the extent of H1N1pdm infection in swine and to identify the risk factors of infection. Methods Virologic and serologic surveillance of swine was carried out in 2009-2010 in pig farms (38 swabs and 1732 sera) and at a pig slaughterhouse (710 swabs and 459 sera) in North Vietnam. The sera were screened using a influenza type A-reactive ELISA assay, and positive sera were tested using hemagglutination inhibition tests for antibody to a panel of H1-subtype viruses representing pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (H1N1pdm), triple reassortant (TRIG), classical swine (CS), and Eurasian avian-like (EA) swine lineages. Farm-level risk factors were identified using a zero-inflated negative binomial model. Results We found a maximal seroprevalence of H1N1pdm of 55·6% [95% CI: 38·1-72·1] in the slaughterhouse at the end of December 2009, 2weeks after the peak of reported human fatalities with H1N1pdm. Farm-level seroprevalence was 29% [95% CI: 23·2-35·7]. In seropositive farms, within-herd seroprevalence ranged from 10 to 100%. We identified an increased risk of infection for farms that specialized in fattening and a decreased risk of infection in farms hiring external swine workers. Conclusions Our findings suggest extensive reverse-zoonotic transmission from humans to pigs with subsequent onward transmission within pig herds. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161158
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.378
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.570
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTrevennec, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeger, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorLyazrhi, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBaudon, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRoger, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, JMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:39:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:39:38Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInfluenza And Other Respiratory Viruses, 2012, v. 6 n. 5, p. 348-357en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1750-2640en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161158-
dc.description.abstractThe pandemic of 2009 was caused by an H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus of swine origin. This pandemic virus has repeatedly infected swine through reverse zoonosis, although the extent of such infection in swine remains unclear. Objective This study targets small and commercial pig producers in North Vietnam, in order to estimate the extent of H1N1pdm infection in swine and to identify the risk factors of infection. Methods Virologic and serologic surveillance of swine was carried out in 2009-2010 in pig farms (38 swabs and 1732 sera) and at a pig slaughterhouse (710 swabs and 459 sera) in North Vietnam. The sera were screened using a influenza type A-reactive ELISA assay, and positive sera were tested using hemagglutination inhibition tests for antibody to a panel of H1-subtype viruses representing pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (H1N1pdm), triple reassortant (TRIG), classical swine (CS), and Eurasian avian-like (EA) swine lineages. Farm-level risk factors were identified using a zero-inflated negative binomial model. Results We found a maximal seroprevalence of H1N1pdm of 55·6% [95% CI: 38·1-72·1] in the slaughterhouse at the end of December 2009, 2weeks after the peak of reported human fatalities with H1N1pdm. Farm-level seroprevalence was 29% [95% CI: 23·2-35·7]. In seropositive farms, within-herd seroprevalence ranged from 10 to 100%. We identified an increased risk of infection for farms that specialized in fattening and a decreased risk of infection in farms hiring external swine workers. Conclusions Our findings suggest extensive reverse-zoonotic transmission from humans to pigs with subsequent onward transmission within pig herds. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=1750-2640&site=1en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInfluenza and other Respiratory Virusesen_HK
dc.subjectCross-species transmissionen_HK
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectInfluenza pandemic H1N1en_HK
dc.subjectSwineen_HK
dc.subjectVietnamen_HK
dc.titleTransmission of pandemic influenza H1N1 (2009) in Vietnamese swine in 2009-2010en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, CY: chungey@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, M: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, CY=rp00404en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, M=rp00410en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1750-2659.2011.00324.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22212737-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865294934en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros204292en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84865294934&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage348en_HK
dc.identifier.epage357en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000307559200007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTrevennec, K=48462069700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeger, L=54880027600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLyazrhi, F=6506263921en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaudon, E=54879334200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, CY=7202061836en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRoger, F=7006292417en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, M=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGarcia, JM=16202601400en_HK

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