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Article: Avian coronavirus in wild aquatic birds
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TitleAvian coronavirus in wild aquatic birds
 
AuthorsChu, DKW1
Leung, CYH1
Gilbert, M2
Joyner, PH2
Ng, EM1
Tse, TM1
Guan, Y1
Peiris, JSM1 3
Poon, LLM1
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
 
CitationJournal Of Virology, 2011, v. 85 n. 23, p. 12815-12820 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.05838-11
 
AbstractWe detected a high prevalence (12.5%) of novel avian coronaviruses in aquatic wild birds. Phylogenetic analyses of these coronaviruses suggest that there is a diversity of gammacoronaviruses and deltacoronaviruses circulating in birds. Gammacoronaviruses were found predominantly in Anseriformes birds, whereas deltacoronaviruses could be detected in Ciconiiformes, Pelecaniformes, and Anseriformes birds in this study. We observed that there are frequent interspecies transmissions of gammacoronaviruses between duck species. In contrast, deltacoronaviruses may have more stringent host specificities. Our analysis of these avian viral and host mitochondrial DNA sequences also suggests that some, but not all, coronaviruses may have coevolved with birds from the same order. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.
 
ISSN0022-538X
2013 Impact Factor: 4.648
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.05838-11
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3209365
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000296708100068
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChu, DKW
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CYH
 
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, M
 
dc.contributor.authorJoyner, PH
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, EM
 
dc.contributor.authorTse, TM
 
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM
 
dc.contributor.authorPoon, LLM
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:39:31Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:39:31Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractWe detected a high prevalence (12.5%) of novel avian coronaviruses in aquatic wild birds. Phylogenetic analyses of these coronaviruses suggest that there is a diversity of gammacoronaviruses and deltacoronaviruses circulating in birds. Gammacoronaviruses were found predominantly in Anseriformes birds, whereas deltacoronaviruses could be detected in Ciconiiformes, Pelecaniformes, and Anseriformes birds in this study. We observed that there are frequent interspecies transmissions of gammacoronaviruses between duck species. In contrast, deltacoronaviruses may have more stringent host specificities. Our analysis of these avian viral and host mitochondrial DNA sequences also suggests that some, but not all, coronaviruses may have coevolved with birds from the same order. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Virology, 2011, v. 85 n. 23, p. 12815-12820 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.05838-11
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.05838-11
 
dc.identifier.epage12820
 
dc.identifier.hkuros203133
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296708100068
 
dc.identifier.issn0022-538X
2013 Impact Factor: 4.648
 
dc.identifier.issue23
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3209365
 
dc.identifier.pmid21957308
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-81255163654
 
dc.identifier.spage12815
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161144
 
dc.identifier.volume85
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Virology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsJournal of Virology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.
 
dc.rightsCopyright © American Society for Microbiology, [insert journal name, volume number, page numbers, and year]
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals, Wild - virology
 
dc.subject.meshBirds - virology
 
dc.subject.meshCoronavirus - classification - isolation and purification
 
dc.subject.meshCoronavirus Infections
 
dc.subject.meshPhylogeny
 
dc.titleAvian coronavirus in wild aquatic birds
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Ng, EM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tse, TM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Guan, Y</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Wildlife Conservation Society
  3. HKU-Pasteur Research Centre