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Book Chapter: Family caregiving and impact on caregiver mental health: a study in Shanghai
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TitleFamily caregiving and impact on caregiver mental health: a study in Shanghai
 
AuthorsLou, VWQ
Gui, SX
 
KeywordsLong-term care
Shanghai
China
Informal caregiving
Depressive symptoms of caregiver
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherSpringer Science+Business Media, LLC
 
CitationFamily caregiving and impact on caregiver mental health: a study in Shanghai. In Chen, SY and Powell, JL (Eds.), Aging in China: Implications to social policy of a changing economic state, p. 187-208. NY: Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, 2012 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractThis chapter analyzes the aging population and related policy in present-day China by pointing out that long-term care needs are growing but China still lacks a national long-term care policy. The case of Shanghai is reviewed, with an observation that there was a missing element in the long-term care model—family caregivers. An empirical study on family caregiving and impact on caregivers’ mental health is described. Findings show that about one-fi fth of the caregivers were at risk of depressive symptoms, a signifi cant number, which deserves policy responses. A national level long-term care policy is suggested so as to clarify the defi nition of long-term care and policy objectives. Moreover, there is a need to integrate needs of family caregivers into the long-term care policy and service model. Financial needs, health needs, and knowledge/skills needs are recommended to be taken into consideration for policy and service development purposes.
 
ISBN9781441983503
 
Series/Report no.International Perspectives on Aging: v. 2
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLou, VWQ
 
dc.contributor.authorGui, SX
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:32:53Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:32:53Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractThis chapter analyzes the aging population and related policy in present-day China by pointing out that long-term care needs are growing but China still lacks a national long-term care policy. The case of Shanghai is reviewed, with an observation that there was a missing element in the long-term care model—family caregivers. An empirical study on family caregiving and impact on caregivers’ mental health is described. Findings show that about one-fi fth of the caregivers were at risk of depressive symptoms, a signifi cant number, which deserves policy responses. A national level long-term care policy is suggested so as to clarify the defi nition of long-term care and policy objectives. Moreover, there is a need to integrate needs of family caregivers into the long-term care policy and service model. Financial needs, health needs, and knowledge/skills needs are recommended to be taken into consideration for policy and service development purposes.
 
dc.identifier.citationFamily caregiving and impact on caregiver mental health: a study in Shanghai. In Chen, SY and Powell, JL (Eds.), Aging in China: Implications to social policy of a changing economic state, p. 187-208. NY: Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, 2012 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage208
 
dc.identifier.hkuros204369
 
dc.identifier.isbn9781441983503
 
dc.identifier.spage187
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/161027
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer Science+Business Media, LLC
 
dc.publisher.placeNew York
 
dc.relation.ispartofAging in China: Implications to social policy of a changing economic state
 
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInternational Perspectives on Aging: v. 2
 
dc.subjectLong-term care
 
dc.subjectShanghai
 
dc.subjectChina
 
dc.subjectInformal caregiving
 
dc.subjectDepressive symptoms of caregiver
 
dc.titleFamily caregiving and impact on caregiver mental health: a study in Shanghai
 
dc.typeBook_Chapter
 
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<identifier.citation>Family caregiving and impact on caregiver mental health: a study in Shanghai. In Chen, SY and Powell, JL (Eds.), Aging in China: Implications to social policy of a changing economic state, p. 187-208. NY: Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, 2012</identifier.citation>
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<description.abstract>This chapter analyzes the aging population and related policy in present-day
China by pointing out that long-term care needs are growing but China still lacks a
national long-term care policy. The case of Shanghai is reviewed, with an observation
that there was a missing element in the long-term care model&#8212;family caregivers. An
empirical study on family caregiving and impact on caregivers&#8217; mental health is
described. Findings show that about one-fi fth of the caregivers were at risk of depressive
symptoms, a signifi cant number, which deserves policy responses. A national
level long-term care policy is suggested so as to clarify the defi nition of long-term care
and policy objectives. Moreover, there is a need to integrate needs of family caregivers
into the long-term care policy and service model. Financial needs, health needs, and
knowledge/skills needs are recommended to be taken into consideration for policy and
service development purposes.</description.abstract>
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<subject>Long-term care</subject>
<subject>Shanghai</subject>
<subject>China</subject>
<subject>Informal caregiving</subject>
<subject>Depressive symptoms of caregiver</subject>
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