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Article: A survey of court interpreters' use of direct versus reported speech in the Hong Kong courts

TitleA survey of court interpreters' use of direct versus reported speech in the Hong Kong courts
Authors
KeywordsFirst-person interpreting
Third-person interpreting
Direct-speech
Reported speech
Power asymmetry
Issue Date2011
PublisherAcademic Scholars Publishing House. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijlld.com/
Citation
International Journal of Law, Language & Discourse, 2011, v. 1 n. 3, p. 29-58 How to Cite?
AbstractThe findings of my ongoing data-based study of courtroom interpreting in the Hong Kong courts reveal a deviation from the generally held principle which requires professional interpreters to interpret in the first person. It has been observed from the data that when interpreting the speech of legal professionals, the interpreters would invariably avoid speaking in the first person. The shifts are so uniform in the sense that they occur only in one direction—a phenomenon which theories previously advanced fail to explain. This has led me to the hypotheses that interpreters in the Hong Kong courtroom are reluctant to assume the voice of the legal professionals because of their consciousness of the power asymmetry between lay-participants and legal professionals in the courtroom and that the practice has little to do with the content of an utterance. In order to test my hypotheses, an online questionnaire was conducted with court interpreters. The results of this survey seem to contest the widely held view that the use of reported speech is a distancing tactic used by the court interpreter to disclaim responsibility for what was said by the speaker, but lend support to my hypotheses.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160734
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, ENSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:17:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:17:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Law, Language & Discourse, 2011, v. 1 n. 3, p. 29-58en_US
dc.identifier.issn1839-8308-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160734-
dc.description.abstractThe findings of my ongoing data-based study of courtroom interpreting in the Hong Kong courts reveal a deviation from the generally held principle which requires professional interpreters to interpret in the first person. It has been observed from the data that when interpreting the speech of legal professionals, the interpreters would invariably avoid speaking in the first person. The shifts are so uniform in the sense that they occur only in one direction—a phenomenon which theories previously advanced fail to explain. This has led me to the hypotheses that interpreters in the Hong Kong courtroom are reluctant to assume the voice of the legal professionals because of their consciousness of the power asymmetry between lay-participants and legal professionals in the courtroom and that the practice has little to do with the content of an utterance. In order to test my hypotheses, an online questionnaire was conducted with court interpreters. The results of this survey seem to contest the widely held view that the use of reported speech is a distancing tactic used by the court interpreter to disclaim responsibility for what was said by the speaker, but lend support to my hypotheses.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Scholars Publishing House. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijlld.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Law, Language & Discourseen_US
dc.subjectFirst-person interpreting-
dc.subjectThird-person interpreting-
dc.subjectDirect-speech-
dc.subjectReported speech-
dc.subjectPower asymmetry-
dc.titleA survey of court interpreters' use of direct versus reported speech in the Hong Kong courtsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, ENS: nsng@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros205555en_US
dc.identifier.volume1en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage29en_US
dc.identifier.epage58en_US
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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