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Article: What is the origin of acupoint

TitleWhat is the origin of acupoint
穴位的起源
Authors
KeywordsAcupoint
Dispelling Exogenous Pathogen
Meridians
Witch Doctors
Issue Date2012
PublisherShanghai Research Institute of Acupuncture and Meridian, co-published with Springer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/complementary+%26+alternative+medicine/journal/11726
Citation
Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science, 2012, v. 10 n. 2, p. 125-127 How to Cite?
AbstractAcupoints originated from the ancient belief that diseases were caused by ghosts and evil spirits haunting the body. Acupoints were believed to be where the ghost and evil spirits hid, and thus, the rationale for healing was to expel the ghost and evil spirits directly from the diseased body part. Huang Di Nei Jing (Yellow Emperor's Inner Canon), an ancient Chinese medical text, mentions "pain as the point" in describing how to locate and manipulate the acupoint. During the era in which Huang Di Nei Jing (Yellow Emperor's Inner Canon) was written, the wide applications of filiform needle acupuncture expedited the amalgamation between acupoint and meridian theories. As a result, the concept of acupoints were further strengthened and expanded in their structures and functions. In the meantime, acupoints had developed to become the key points for qi and blood circulating inside the human body rather than where evil spirits hid. The formation and finalization of acupoints actually reveal a historical progression from witchcraft to medicine. © 2012 Shanghai Research Institute of Acupuncture and Meridian and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160714
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.216
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorYau, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorYau, Cen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:17:17Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:17:17Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science, 2012, v. 10 n. 2, p. 125-127en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1672-3597en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160714-
dc.description.abstractAcupoints originated from the ancient belief that diseases were caused by ghosts and evil spirits haunting the body. Acupoints were believed to be where the ghost and evil spirits hid, and thus, the rationale for healing was to expel the ghost and evil spirits directly from the diseased body part. Huang Di Nei Jing (Yellow Emperor's Inner Canon), an ancient Chinese medical text, mentions "pain as the point" in describing how to locate and manipulate the acupoint. During the era in which Huang Di Nei Jing (Yellow Emperor's Inner Canon) was written, the wide applications of filiform needle acupuncture expedited the amalgamation between acupoint and meridian theories. As a result, the concept of acupoints were further strengthened and expanded in their structures and functions. In the meantime, acupoints had developed to become the key points for qi and blood circulating inside the human body rather than where evil spirits hid. The formation and finalization of acupoints actually reveal a historical progression from witchcraft to medicine. © 2012 Shanghai Research Institute of Acupuncture and Meridian and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherShanghai Research Institute of Acupuncture and Meridian, co-published with Springer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/complementary+%26+alternative+medicine/journal/11726en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Acupuncture and Tuina Scienceen_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAcupointen_HK
dc.subjectDispelling Exogenous Pathogenen_HK
dc.subjectMeridiansen_HK
dc.subjectWitch Doctorsen_HK
dc.titleWhat is the origin of acupointen_HK
dc.title穴位的起源-
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, L: llie@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, L=rp01353en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11726-012-0587-8en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859338231en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros203296en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859338231&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume10en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage125en_HK
dc.identifier.epage127en_HK
dc.publisher.placeChina-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, L=47961141000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, T=55169600200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, C=55169913300en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10559122-
dc.customcontrol.immutablejt 130328-

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