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Article: Prefrontal deviations in function but not volume are putative endophenotypes for schizophrenia
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TitlePrefrontal deviations in function but not volume are putative endophenotypes for schizophrenia
 
AuthorsOwens, SF2 1
Picchioni, MM2
Ettinger, U3
McDonald, C5
Walshe, M2
Schmechtig, A2
Murray, RM2
Rijsdijk, F2
Toulopoulou, T2 4
 
KeywordsFamily
Genetic
MRI
Prefrontal
Twin
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/
 
CitationBrain, 2012, v. 135 n. 7, p. 2231-2244 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/aws138
 
AbstractThis study sought to systematically investigate whether prefrontal cortex grey matter volume reductions are valid endophenotypes for schizophrenia, specifically investigating their presence in unaffected relatives, heritability, genetic overlap with the disorder itself and finally to contrast their performance on these criteria with putative neuropsychological indices of prefrontal functioning. We used a combined twin and family design and examined four prefrontal cortical regions of interest. Superior and inferior regions were significantly smaller in patients. However, the volumes of these same regions were normal in unaffected relatives and therefore, we could confirm that such deficits were not due to familial effects. Volumes of the prefrontal and orbital cortices were, however, moderately heritable, but neither shared a genetic overlap with schizophrenia. Total prefrontal cortical volume reductions shared a significant unique environmental overlap with the disorder, suggesting that the reductions were not familial. In contrast, prefrontal (executive) functioning deficits were present in the unaffected relatives, were moderately heritable and shared a substantial genetic overlap with liability to schizophrenia. These results suggest that the well recognized prefrontal volume reductions are not related to the same familial influences that increase schizophrenia liability and instead may be attributable to illness related biological changes or indeed confounded by illness trajectory, chronicity, medication or substance abuse, or in fact a combination of some or all of them. © The Author (2012). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0006-8950
2012 Impact Factor: 9.915
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.603
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/aws138
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3381723
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorOwens, SF
 
dc.contributor.authorPicchioni, MM
 
dc.contributor.authorEttinger, U
 
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, C
 
dc.contributor.authorWalshe, M
 
dc.contributor.authorSchmechtig, A
 
dc.contributor.authorMurray, RM
 
dc.contributor.authorRijsdijk, F
 
dc.contributor.authorToulopoulou, T
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:16:20Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:16:20Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractThis study sought to systematically investigate whether prefrontal cortex grey matter volume reductions are valid endophenotypes for schizophrenia, specifically investigating their presence in unaffected relatives, heritability, genetic overlap with the disorder itself and finally to contrast their performance on these criteria with putative neuropsychological indices of prefrontal functioning. We used a combined twin and family design and examined four prefrontal cortical regions of interest. Superior and inferior regions were significantly smaller in patients. However, the volumes of these same regions were normal in unaffected relatives and therefore, we could confirm that such deficits were not due to familial effects. Volumes of the prefrontal and orbital cortices were, however, moderately heritable, but neither shared a genetic overlap with schizophrenia. Total prefrontal cortical volume reductions shared a significant unique environmental overlap with the disorder, suggesting that the reductions were not familial. In contrast, prefrontal (executive) functioning deficits were present in the unaffected relatives, were moderately heritable and shared a substantial genetic overlap with liability to schizophrenia. These results suggest that the well recognized prefrontal volume reductions are not related to the same familial influences that increase schizophrenia liability and instead may be attributable to illness related biological changes or indeed confounded by illness trajectory, chronicity, medication or substance abuse, or in fact a combination of some or all of them. © The Author (2012). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBrain, 2012, v. 135 n. 7, p. 2231-2244 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/aws138
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/aws138
 
dc.identifier.epage2244
 
dc.identifier.hkuros205264
 
dc.identifier.hkuros223332
 
dc.identifier.issn0006-8950
2012 Impact Factor: 9.915
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.603
 
dc.identifier.issue7
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3381723
 
dc.identifier.pmid22693145
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863191771
 
dc.identifier.spage2231
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160678
 
dc.identifier.volume135
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofBrain
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectFamily
 
dc.subjectGenetic
 
dc.subjectMRI
 
dc.subjectPrefrontal
 
dc.subjectTwin
 
dc.titlePrefrontal deviations in function but not volume are putative endophenotypes for schizophrenia
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Walshe, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Schmechtig, A</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Murray, RM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Rijsdijk, F</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. UCL
  2. King's College London
  3. Universität Bonn
  4. The University of Hong Kong
  5. National University of Ireland Galway