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Article: Cognitive effects of calligraphy therapy for older people: a randomized controlled trial in Hong Kong

TitleCognitive effects of calligraphy therapy for older people: a randomized controlled trial in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherDove Medical Press Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.dovepress.com/articles.php?journal_id=4
Citation
Clinical Interventions in Aging, 2011, v. 6, p. 269-273 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: This pilot study investigated the effects of calligraphy therapy on cognitive function in older Hong Kong Chinese people with mild cognitive impairment. METHODS: A single-blind, randomized controlled trial was carried out in a sample of 31 adults aged 65 years or older with mild cognitive impairment. They were randomly assigned to receive either intensive calligraphy training led by a trained research assistant for eight weeks (calligraphy group, n = 14) or no calligraphy treatment (control group, n = 17). Participants' cognitive function was assessed by the Chinese version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (CMMSE) before and after calligraphy treatment. Repeated measures analysis of variance and paired samples t-tests were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: A significant interaction effect of time and intervention was detected [F (1, 29) = 9.11, P = 0.005, eta(2) = 0.24]. The calligraphy group was found to have a prominent increase in CMMSE global score, and scores in the cognitive areas of orientation, attention, and calculation after two months (DeltaM = 2.36, P < 0.01), whereas their counterparts in the control group experienced a decline in CMMSE score (DeltaM = -0.41, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Calligraphy therapy was effective for enhancing cognitive function in older people with mild cognitive impairment and should be incorporated as part of routine programs in both community and residential care settings. © 2011 Kwok et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160674
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 1.824
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.865
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, TCYen_US
dc.contributor.authorBai, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorKao, HSRen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, JCYen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, FKYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:16:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:16:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Interventions in Aging, 2011, v. 6, p. 269-273en_US
dc.identifier.issn1176-9092-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160674-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: This pilot study investigated the effects of calligraphy therapy on cognitive function in older Hong Kong Chinese people with mild cognitive impairment. METHODS: A single-blind, randomized controlled trial was carried out in a sample of 31 adults aged 65 years or older with mild cognitive impairment. They were randomly assigned to receive either intensive calligraphy training led by a trained research assistant for eight weeks (calligraphy group, n = 14) or no calligraphy treatment (control group, n = 17). Participants' cognitive function was assessed by the Chinese version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (CMMSE) before and after calligraphy treatment. Repeated measures analysis of variance and paired samples t-tests were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: A significant interaction effect of time and intervention was detected [F (1, 29) = 9.11, P = 0.005, eta(2) = 0.24]. The calligraphy group was found to have a prominent increase in CMMSE global score, and scores in the cognitive areas of orientation, attention, and calculation after two months (DeltaM = 2.36, P < 0.01), whereas their counterparts in the control group experienced a decline in CMMSE score (DeltaM = -0.41, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Calligraphy therapy was effective for enhancing cognitive function in older people with mild cognitive impairment and should be incorporated as part of routine programs in both community and residential care settings. © 2011 Kwok et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDove Medical Press Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.dovepress.com/articles.php?journal_id=4en_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Interventions in Agingen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshDementia - psychology - therapy-
dc.subject.meshGeriatric Assessment - methods-
dc.subject.meshHandwriting-
dc.subject.meshMental Competency-
dc.subject.meshMind-Body Therapies - methods-
dc.titleCognitive effects of calligraphy therapy for older people: a randomized controlled trial in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBai, X: xuebai@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKao, HSR: dpsychol@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.2147/CIA.S25395-
dc.identifier.pmid22087066-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3212418-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80755126938-
dc.identifier.hkuros204195en_US
dc.identifier.volume6en_US
dc.identifier.spage269en_US
dc.identifier.epage273en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299337200033-
dc.publisher.placeNew Zealand-

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