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Article: Yogurt Can Beneficially Affect Blood Contributors of Cardiovascular Health Status in Hypertensive Rats

TitleYogurt Can Beneficially Affect Blood Contributors of Cardiovascular Health Status in Hypertensive Rats
Authors
KeywordsACE-inhibition
Antihypertensive
Hypocholesterolemic
SHR
Yogurt
Issue Date2011
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-1147
Citation
Journal Of Food Science, 2011, v. 76 n. 4, p. H131-H136 How to Cite?
AbstractCardiovascular disease is the single leading cause of death in the world and elevated blood pressure is one of the major independent risk factors. Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme-inhibitors have received considerable attention for their effectiveness in both the prevention and the treatment of hypertension. To confirm the antihypertensive effect, the influence of yogurt- and probiotic yogurt-based diets on the weight gain, serum lipid profile, and blood pressure (BP) were investigated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (14 wk old). A total of 3 dietary treatments were fed for 8 wk: skim milk diet (Feed-C), skim milk diet supplemented with freeze dried low fat yogurt (Feed-Y), and with freeze dried low-fat probiotic yogurt (Feed-PY). The total weight gain for the 8-wk period was maximum in rats fed Feed-C (90 g) followed by those fed Feed-PY (85.7 g) and Feed-Y (78.7 g), indicating that the overall weight gains were lesser (statistically non-significant) in the groups fed yogurt containing diets. At the end of the feeding period the reduction in systolic BP of rats fed Feed-Y was 3.7% (-9.5 mm Hg) and 2.7% (-6.4 mm Hg) in those fed Feed-PY while reduction in diastolic BP was 30% (-9.4 mm Hg) and 44% (-13.8 mm Hg), respectively, in comparison to those fed Feed-C. The levels of total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol of rats fed the supplemented diets were lower than those fed Feed-C while no changes in the levels of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol were observed. It was concluded that feeding diets supplemented with yogurts exhibited antihypertensive and hypocholesterolemic effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists ®.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160594
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.649
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.839
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRamchandran, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorShah, NPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:14:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:14:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Food Science, 2011, v. 76 n. 4, p. H131-H136en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-1147en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160594-
dc.description.abstractCardiovascular disease is the single leading cause of death in the world and elevated blood pressure is one of the major independent risk factors. Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme-inhibitors have received considerable attention for their effectiveness in both the prevention and the treatment of hypertension. To confirm the antihypertensive effect, the influence of yogurt- and probiotic yogurt-based diets on the weight gain, serum lipid profile, and blood pressure (BP) were investigated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (14 wk old). A total of 3 dietary treatments were fed for 8 wk: skim milk diet (Feed-C), skim milk diet supplemented with freeze dried low fat yogurt (Feed-Y), and with freeze dried low-fat probiotic yogurt (Feed-PY). The total weight gain for the 8-wk period was maximum in rats fed Feed-C (90 g) followed by those fed Feed-PY (85.7 g) and Feed-Y (78.7 g), indicating that the overall weight gains were lesser (statistically non-significant) in the groups fed yogurt containing diets. At the end of the feeding period the reduction in systolic BP of rats fed Feed-Y was 3.7% (-9.5 mm Hg) and 2.7% (-6.4 mm Hg) in those fed Feed-PY while reduction in diastolic BP was 30% (-9.4 mm Hg) and 44% (-13.8 mm Hg), respectively, in comparison to those fed Feed-C. The levels of total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol of rats fed the supplemented diets were lower than those fed Feed-C while no changes in the levels of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol were observed. It was concluded that feeding diets supplemented with yogurts exhibited antihypertensive and hypocholesterolemic effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists ®.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-1147en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Food Scienceen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.subjectACE-inhibitionen_HK
dc.subjectAntihypertensiveen_HK
dc.subjectHypocholesterolemicen_HK
dc.subjectSHRen_HK
dc.subjectYogurten_HK
dc.subject.meshAntihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use-
dc.subject.meshDietary Supplements-
dc.subject.meshHypertension - blood - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshProbiotics - administration and dosage-
dc.subject.meshYogurt - analysis-
dc.titleYogurt Can Beneficially Affect Blood Contributors of Cardiovascular Health Status in Hypertensive Ratsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailShah, NP: npshah@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityShah, NP=rp01571en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1750-3841.2011.02127.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22417361-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79955575033en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros205687en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79955575033&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume76en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spageH131en_HK
dc.identifier.epageH136en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290270600010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRamchandran, L=23467601800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShah, NP=7401823907en_HK

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