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Conference Paper: Action videogame playing can improve visual-motor control without affecting vision

TitleAction videogame playing can improve visual-motor control without affecting vision
Authors
KeywordsPsychology medical sciences
Ophthalmology and optometry
Issue Date2012
PublisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perceptionweb.com
Citation
The 35th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2012), Alghero, Italy, 2-6 September 2012. In Perception, 2012, v. 41 suppl., p. 102-103, abstract no. 108 How to Cite?
Abstract
We examined how action videogame playing affects visual-motor control using a manual control task in which participants used a joystick to keep a blob centered on a large display as its horizontal position was randomly perturbed. Six naive Non-Videogame Players were trained with an action videogame (Mario Kart Wii, Nintendo), and six were trained with a strategy videogame (Roller Coaster Tycoon III, Atari) for 1–2 hours a day for 10 hours in total. Their performance on the manual control task was measured before the training, after 5-hour training, and after 10-hour training, and their contrast sensitivity function (CSF) was measured before and after training. For the group trained with the action videogame, the RMS error of their performance on the manual control task decreased by 14% (SD: 8%) after 5-hour training and by 20% (SD: 6%) after 10-hour training, and their overall control response (gain) increased by 24% (SD: 11%) after 5-hour training and by 32% (SD: 15%) after 10-hour training. The improvement sustained when they were retested on the manual control task between 2–4 months later. In contrast, no change of RMS or gain was observed for the group trained with the strategy videogame. For both groups, no change in CSF was found. We conclude that action videogame playing can improve visual-motor control without affecting vision.
DescriptionOpen Access Journal
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160488
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 1.114

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:12:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:12:19Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 35th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2012), Alghero, Italy, 2-6 September 2012. In Perception, 2012, v. 41 suppl., p. 102-103, abstract no. 108en_US
dc.identifier.issn0301-0066-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160488-
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. contains the ECVP 2012 conference abstracts-
dc.descriptionPosters: Applied vision-
dc.description.abstractWe examined how action videogame playing affects visual-motor control using a manual control task in which participants used a joystick to keep a blob centered on a large display as its horizontal position was randomly perturbed. Six naive Non-Videogame Players were trained with an action videogame (Mario Kart Wii, Nintendo), and six were trained with a strategy videogame (Roller Coaster Tycoon III, Atari) for 1–2 hours a day for 10 hours in total. Their performance on the manual control task was measured before the training, after 5-hour training, and after 10-hour training, and their contrast sensitivity function (CSF) was measured before and after training. For the group trained with the action videogame, the RMS error of their performance on the manual control task decreased by 14% (SD: 8%) after 5-hour training and by 20% (SD: 6%) after 10-hour training, and their overall control response (gain) increased by 24% (SD: 11%) after 5-hour training and by 32% (SD: 15%) after 10-hour training. The improvement sustained when they were retested on the manual control task between 2–4 months later. In contrast, no change of RMS or gain was observed for the group trained with the strategy videogame. For both groups, no change in CSF was found. We conclude that action videogame playing can improve visual-motor control without affecting vision.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perceptionweb.com-
dc.relation.ispartofPerceptionen_US
dc.subjectPsychology medical sciences-
dc.subjectOphthalmology and optometry-
dc.titleAction videogame playing can improve visual-motor control without affecting visionen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, L: lili@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, R: rainecrr@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, J: jing0504@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, L=rp00636en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros204692en_US
dc.identifier.volume41-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl.-
dc.identifier.spage102-
dc.identifier.epage103-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130327-

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