File Download
 
 
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Action videogame playing can improve visual-motor control without affecting vision
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleAction videogame playing can improve visual-motor control without affecting vision
 
AuthorsLi, L
Chen, R
Chen, J
 
KeywordsPsychology medical sciences
Ophthalmology and optometry
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perceptionweb.com
 
CitationThe 35th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2012), Alghero, Italy, 2-6 September 2012. In Perception, 2012, v. 41 suppl., p. 102-103, abstract no. 108 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractWe examined how action videogame playing affects visual-motor control using a manual control task in which participants used a joystick to keep a blob centered on a large display as its horizontal position was randomly perturbed. Six naive Non-Videogame Players were trained with an action videogame (Mario Kart Wii, Nintendo), and six were trained with a strategy videogame (Roller Coaster Tycoon III, Atari) for 1–2 hours a day for 10 hours in total. Their performance on the manual control task was measured before the training, after 5-hour training, and after 10-hour training, and their contrast sensitivity function (CSF) was measured before and after training. For the group trained with the action videogame, the RMS error of their performance on the manual control task decreased by 14% (SD: 8%) after 5-hour training and by 20% (SD: 6%) after 10-hour training, and their overall control response (gain) increased by 24% (SD: 11%) after 5-hour training and by 32% (SD: 15%) after 10-hour training. The improvement sustained when they were retested on the manual control task between 2–4 months later. In contrast, no change of RMS or gain was observed for the group trained with the strategy videogame. For both groups, no change in CSF was found. We conclude that action videogame playing can improve visual-motor control without affecting vision.
 
DescriptionOpen Access Journal
This journal suppl. contains the ECVP 2012 conference abstracts
Posters: Applied vision
 
ISSN0301-0066
2012 Impact Factor: 1.311
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLi, L
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, R
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, J
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:12:19Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:12:19Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractWe examined how action videogame playing affects visual-motor control using a manual control task in which participants used a joystick to keep a blob centered on a large display as its horizontal position was randomly perturbed. Six naive Non-Videogame Players were trained with an action videogame (Mario Kart Wii, Nintendo), and six were trained with a strategy videogame (Roller Coaster Tycoon III, Atari) for 1–2 hours a day for 10 hours in total. Their performance on the manual control task was measured before the training, after 5-hour training, and after 10-hour training, and their contrast sensitivity function (CSF) was measured before and after training. For the group trained with the action videogame, the RMS error of their performance on the manual control task decreased by 14% (SD: 8%) after 5-hour training and by 20% (SD: 6%) after 10-hour training, and their overall control response (gain) increased by 24% (SD: 11%) after 5-hour training and by 32% (SD: 15%) after 10-hour training. The improvement sustained when they were retested on the manual control task between 2–4 months later. In contrast, no change of RMS or gain was observed for the group trained with the strategy videogame. For both groups, no change in CSF was found. We conclude that action videogame playing can improve visual-motor control without affecting vision.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal
 
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. contains the ECVP 2012 conference abstracts
 
dc.descriptionPosters: Applied vision
 
dc.identifier.citationThe 35th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2012), Alghero, Italy, 2-6 September 2012. In Perception, 2012, v. 41 suppl., p. 102-103, abstract no. 108 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage103
 
dc.identifier.hkuros204692
 
dc.identifier.issn0301-0066
2012 Impact Factor: 1.311
 
dc.identifier.issuesuppl.
 
dc.identifier.spage102
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160488
 
dc.identifier.volume41
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perceptionweb.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofPerception
 
dc.subjectPsychology medical sciences
 
dc.subjectOphthalmology and optometry
 
dc.titleAction videogame playing can improve visual-motor control without affecting vision
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Li, L</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chen, R</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chen, J</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-08-16T06:12:19Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-08-16T06:12:19Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2012</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>The 35th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2012), Alghero, Italy, 2-6 September 2012. In Perception, 2012, v. 41 suppl., p. 102-103, abstract no. 108</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0301-0066</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/160488</identifier.uri>
<description>Open Access Journal</description>
<description>This journal suppl. contains the ECVP 2012 conference abstracts</description>
<description>Posters: Applied vision</description>
<description.abstract>We examined how action videogame playing affects visual-motor control using a manual control task in which participants used a joystick to keep a blob centered on a large display as its horizontal position was randomly perturbed. Six naive Non-Videogame Players were trained with an action videogame (Mario Kart Wii, Nintendo), and six were trained with a strategy videogame (Roller Coaster Tycoon III, Atari) for 1&#8211;2 hours a day for 10 hours in total. Their performance on the manual control task was measured before the training, after 5-hour training, and after 10-hour training, and their contrast sensitivity function (CSF) was measured before and after training. For the group trained with the action videogame, the RMS error of their performance on the manual control task decreased by 14% (SD: 8%) after 5-hour training and by 20% (SD: 6%) after 10-hour training, and their overall control response (gain) increased by 24% (SD: 11%) after 5-hour training and by 32% (SD: 15%) after 10-hour training. The improvement sustained when they were retested on the manual control task between 2&#8211;4 months later. In contrast, no change of RMS or gain was observed for the group trained with the strategy videogame. For both groups, no change in CSF was found. We conclude that action videogame playing can improve visual-motor control without affecting vision.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Pion Ltd.. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.perceptionweb.com</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Perception</relation.ispartof>
<subject>Psychology medical sciences</subject>
<subject>Ophthalmology and optometry</subject>
<title>Action videogame playing can improve visual-motor control without affecting vision</title>
<type>Conference_Paper</type>
<description.nature>link_to_OA_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.hkuros>204692</identifier.hkuros>
<identifier.volume>41</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>suppl.</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>102</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>103</identifier.epage>
<publisher.place>United Kingdom</publisher.place>
<bitstream.url>http://hub.hku.hk/bitstream/10722/160488/1/re01.htm</bitstream.url>
</item>