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Conference Paper: Profiling biomolecules at cell-biomaterial interface by quantitative proteomics

TitleProfiling biomolecules at cell-biomaterial interface by quantitative proteomics
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherTERMIS-NA.
Citation
The 2010 North America Conference of the Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS-NA 2010), Orlando, FL., 5-8 December 2010. How to Cite?
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Implant surface structure and chemistry determines the contacting cell’s fate. Therefore, the fate of those cells directly affect bone-implant incorporation in clinical practice1-5. However, how these chemical and mechanical signals translating to cellular responses are not yet known. The major drawback is a lack of systematic study of cellbiomaterial interaction in terms of protein expression, specifically, at the attachment interface between the cell and biomaterial (adherence surface, AS). Therefore, we have proposed to unbiasedly identify the biomolecules at the interface by proteomics. This method combines the use of a subcellular fractionation with quantitative mass …
DescriptionSession: Controlling Microenvironment and Cell Fate: abstract no. 789
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160358

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTong, WYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiang, YMen_US
dc.contributor.authorTam, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorYip, HKen_US
dc.contributor.authorKao, YTen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_US
dc.contributor.authorYeung, KWKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, YWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:08:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:08:35Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2010 North America Conference of the Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS-NA 2010), Orlando, FL., 5-8 December 2010.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160358-
dc.descriptionSession: Controlling Microenvironment and Cell Fate: abstract no. 789-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Implant surface structure and chemistry determines the contacting cell’s fate. Therefore, the fate of those cells directly affect bone-implant incorporation in clinical practice1-5. However, how these chemical and mechanical signals translating to cellular responses are not yet known. The major drawback is a lack of systematic study of cellbiomaterial interaction in terms of protein expression, specifically, at the attachment interface between the cell and biomaterial (adherence surface, AS). Therefore, we have proposed to unbiasedly identify the biomolecules at the interface by proteomics. This method combines the use of a subcellular fractionation with quantitative mass …-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTERMIS-NA.-
dc.relation.ispartofTERMIS-Americas 2010 Orlando Conferenceen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleProfiling biomolecules at cell-biomaterial interface by quantitative proteomicsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailTam, V: vivtam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKao, YT: rytkao@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC: cheungmc@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYeung, KWK: wkkyeung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, YW: yunwlam@cityu.edu.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKao, YT=rp00481en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, KWK=rp00309en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros204564en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.description.otherThe 2010 North America Conference of the Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS-NA 2010), Orlando, FL., 5-8 December 2010.-

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