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Article: Walking for Recreation and Perceptions of the Neighborhood Environment in Older Chinese Urban Dwellers
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TitleWalking for Recreation and Perceptions of the Neighborhood Environment in Older Chinese Urban Dwellers
 
AuthorsCerin, E1
Sit, CHP1
Barnett, A1
Cheung, Mc2
Chan, Wm2
 
KeywordsModerators
Older adults
Perceived environment
Walking for recreation
 
Issue Date2013
 
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springerlink.com/content/1099-3460
 
CitationJournal Of Urban Health, 2013, v. 90 n. 1, p. 56-66 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11524-012-9704-8
 
AbstractEngagement in walking for recreation can contribute to healthy aging. Although there is growing evidence that the neighborhood environment can influence walking for recreation, the amount of such evidence in relation to older adults is scarce and limited to Western low-density urban locations. Asian urban environments are typified by distinctive environmental and cultural characteristics that may yield different patterns to those observed in Western countries. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to examine associations of perceived environmental attributes with overall and within-neighborhood walking for recreation in Chinese elders (65+ years) residing in Hong Kong, an ultradense Asian metropolis. A sample of 484 elders was recruited from 32 neighborhoods stratified by socio-economic status and walkability (dwelling and intersection densities). Validated questionnaires measuring perceived neighborhood environment and weekly minutes of overall and within-neighborhood walking for recreation were interviewer administered. Results showed that the level of recreational walking was twice to four times higher than that reported in Western adults and elders. While overall walking for recreation showed a general lack of associations with perceived environmental attributes, within-neighborhood recreational walking was positively related with proximity of recreational facilities, infrastructure for walking, indoor places for walking, and presence of bridge/overpasses connecting to services. Age and educational attainment moderated the associations with several perceived environmental attributes with older and less-educated participants showing stronger associations. Traditional cultural views on the benefits of physical activity and the high accessibility of facilities and pedestrian infrastructure of Hong Kong may explain the high levels of walking. Although specific neighborhood attributes, or their perception, may influence recreational walking within the neighborhood, the compactness and public transport affordability of ultradense metropolises such as Hong Kong may make it easy for elders to compensate for the lack of favorable neighborhood attributes by walking outside the neighborhood. © 2012 The New York Academy of Medicine.
 
ISSN1099-3460
2013 Impact Factor: 1.943
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11524-012-9704-8
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000315435000004
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCerin, E
 
dc.contributor.authorSit, CHP
 
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, A
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Mc
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, Wm
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-16T06:02:50Z
 
dc.date.available2012-08-16T06:02:50Z
 
dc.date.issued2013
 
dc.description.abstractEngagement in walking for recreation can contribute to healthy aging. Although there is growing evidence that the neighborhood environment can influence walking for recreation, the amount of such evidence in relation to older adults is scarce and limited to Western low-density urban locations. Asian urban environments are typified by distinctive environmental and cultural characteristics that may yield different patterns to those observed in Western countries. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to examine associations of perceived environmental attributes with overall and within-neighborhood walking for recreation in Chinese elders (65+ years) residing in Hong Kong, an ultradense Asian metropolis. A sample of 484 elders was recruited from 32 neighborhoods stratified by socio-economic status and walkability (dwelling and intersection densities). Validated questionnaires measuring perceived neighborhood environment and weekly minutes of overall and within-neighborhood walking for recreation were interviewer administered. Results showed that the level of recreational walking was twice to four times higher than that reported in Western adults and elders. While overall walking for recreation showed a general lack of associations with perceived environmental attributes, within-neighborhood recreational walking was positively related with proximity of recreational facilities, infrastructure for walking, indoor places for walking, and presence of bridge/overpasses connecting to services. Age and educational attainment moderated the associations with several perceived environmental attributes with older and less-educated participants showing stronger associations. Traditional cultural views on the benefits of physical activity and the high accessibility of facilities and pedestrian infrastructure of Hong Kong may explain the high levels of walking. Although specific neighborhood attributes, or their perception, may influence recreational walking within the neighborhood, the compactness and public transport affordability of ultradense metropolises such as Hong Kong may make it easy for elders to compensate for the lack of favorable neighborhood attributes by walking outside the neighborhood. © 2012 The New York Academy of Medicine.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Urban Health, 2013, v. 90 n. 1, p. 56-66 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11524-012-9704-8
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10783703
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11524-012-9704-8
 
dc.identifier.eissn1468-2869
 
dc.identifier.epage66
 
dc.identifier.hkuros205738
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000315435000004
 
dc.identifier.issn1099-3460
2013 Impact Factor: 1.943
 
dc.identifier.pmid22678651
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84877024525
 
dc.identifier.spage56
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/160080
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springerlink.com/content/1099-3460
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Urban Health
 
dc.subjectModerators
 
dc.subjectOlder adults
 
dc.subjectPerceived environment
 
dc.subjectWalking for recreation
 
dc.titleWalking for Recreation and Perceptions of the Neighborhood Environment in Older Chinese Urban Dwellers
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Sit, CHP</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Cheung, Mc</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, Wm</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Engagement in walking for recreation can contribute to healthy aging. Although there is growing evidence that the neighborhood environment can influence walking for recreation, the amount of such evidence in relation to older adults is scarce and limited to Western low-density urban locations. Asian urban environments are typified by distinctive environmental and cultural characteristics that may yield different patterns to those observed in Western countries. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to examine associations of perceived environmental attributes with overall and within-neighborhood walking for recreation in Chinese elders (65+&#160;years) residing in Hong Kong, an ultradense Asian metropolis. A sample of 484 elders was recruited from 32 neighborhoods stratified by socio-economic status and walkability (dwelling and intersection densities). Validated questionnaires measuring perceived neighborhood environment and weekly minutes of overall and within-neighborhood walking for recreation were interviewer administered. Results showed that the level of recreational walking was twice to four times higher than that reported in Western adults and elders. While overall walking for recreation showed a general lack of associations with perceived environmental attributes, within-neighborhood recreational walking was positively related with proximity of recreational facilities, infrastructure for walking, indoor places for walking, and presence of bridge/overpasses connecting to services. Age and educational attainment moderated the associations with several perceived environmental attributes with older and less-educated participants showing stronger associations. Traditional cultural views on the benefits of physical activity and the high accessibility of facilities and pedestrian infrastructure of Hong Kong may explain the high levels of walking. Although specific neighborhood attributes, or their perception, may influence recreational walking within the neighborhood, the compactness and public transport affordability of ultradense metropolises such as Hong Kong may make it easy for elders to compensate for the lack of favorable neighborhood attributes by walking outside the neighborhood. &#169; 2012 The New York Academy of Medicine.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Hong Kong Government